Page Three

Karl Berger’s Improvisers Orchestra in the News: The New York Times
“Karl Berger, the jazz pianist, vibraphonist and conductor of improvisers, ran a workshop for his orchestra before its performance at Shapeshifter Lab in Brooklyn on Thursday night. He uses a few simple hand signals for duration, attack and pitch, and the musicians wanted to be sure they were interpreting the specifics correctly. But Mr. Berger seemed more concerned with telling them something very general.“Hear your sound as if you’re playing the sound of the whole group,” he told them.”

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/20/arts/music/karl-bergers-improvisers-orchestra-at-shapeshifter-lab.html


Keyboard Wizard John Medeski to Join CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop

Keyboard wizard John Medeski to Join Dave Douglas, Oliver Lake, Steven Bernstein, Don Byron, Mark Helias, Tani Tabbal, Ken Wessel, Ken Filiano and Thomas Buckner As Guiding Artists for the Creative Music Studio’s 40th Anniversary Workshop

May 20-May 24 Workshop Features Intensive Master Classes, Presentations and Exciting Jam Sessions with an All-Star Roster of Guiding Artists


REGISTER NOW!

* Curriculum
* Guiding Artist Biographies
* About Full Moon Resort
* FAQ
* Pricing and Registration
* Directions/Transportation

 

I

Woodstock, NY, March 11, 2013 – Keyboard wizard John Medeski is the latest Guiding Artist confirmed to help celebrate the Creative Music Stuido’s 40th anniversary by participating in the CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop, May 20-24, at Full Moon Resort just west of Woodstock. In addition to Medeski, Guiding Artists confirmed to attend include trumpeters Dave Douglas and Steven Bernstein, saxophonist Oliver Lake, reedist Don Byron, pianist Marilyn Crispell, flutist Steve Gorn, guitarist Ken Wessel, bassists Mark Helias and Ken Filiano, drummers Harvey Sorgen and Tani Tabbal, vocalists Thomas Buckner and Ingrid Sertso, and pianist Karl Berger. Additional Guiding Artists and Special Guests are expected and will be announced soon. .

This 40th Anniversary Workshop will feature four days of intensive workshops, master classes, presentations and informal jam sessions that inspire deep listening, personal expression, improvisation and musical exploration. Musicians of any instrument, including voice, are welcome as are non-musicians. Guiding artists will build on CMS’s legacy by helping participants focus on the common elements of all music, emphasizing keen awareness, personal expression, intensive listening and cross-cultural communication. The workshop offers participants a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to learn from and play with music masters, and to simply spend time with them in an informal setting.

“Reminiscent of CMS’s campus in Woodstock, the Full Moon Resort is the perfect place for a CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop,” said Karl Berger, CMS founder and artistic director. “It’s an environment that will excite and inspire, where musicians and students can live, play and record, just as they did at CMS decades ago. The non-traditional atmosphere of the Creative Music Studio Workshop will encourage participants to experiment, push beyond limits, genres and categories, to take risks, and to develop their own deeply personal musical expression.”

A typical day at the CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop begins with body work such as Tai Chi or yoga, a gourmet breakfast and a morning master class with Guiding Artists. Lunch is at noon, followed by some free time. Afternoons feature two workshops/master classes with Guiding Artists John Medeski, Oliver Lake, Dave Douglas, Steven Bernstein, Don Byron, Marilyn Crispell, Steve Gorn, Tani Tabbal, Ken Filiano, Ken Wessel, Mark Helias, Thomas Buckner, Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso. After some late afternoon free time and dinner, evenings will include concerts, jam sessions, or workshops. Late night consists of playing music, bonfires, or simply stargazing at Full Moon’s gorgeous location in the heart of the Catskill Mountains.

CMS’s parent nonprofit, the Creative Music Foundation, is working to offer full and partial scholarships for the workshop.

For more information, including a curriculum and online registration, please visit:

http://www.creativemusicfoundation.org/cms-40th-anniversary-workshop.html.

The Creative Music Foundation, a 501C(3) nonprofit corporation, makes it possible to profoundly experience and express our deep connection with the transforming energies of music, our universal language. CMF programs focus on the common elements of all music, emphasizing keen awareness, personal expression, intensive listening and cross-cultural communication, and providing unique opportunities for musicians, students and listeners from different backgrounds and traditions to explore together, share, develop, and broaden their musical understanding and sensitivity. CMF pursues its mission through workshops, residencies, coaching, concerts, recordings and archival projects that engage both listeners and musicians in the USA and around the world.

Please join us for this very special CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop and Retreat. Attendance is limited so please…

REGISTER NOW! 

Full Moon contact info:
Telephone: 845-254-8009
Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm (EST)

 

 

Curriculum

Monday, May 20

  • Opening orientation in the Barn, hosted by Karl Berger, Ingrid Sertso and other special workshop leaders.
    • Introducing featured artists and any special guests (music and/or other)
    • Brief review of daily workshops, activities, performances
  • Meet and Greet on Front Lawn with Open Bar and Hors D’Oeuvres
  • Dinner
  • Opening night performance in the Main Stage Tent
  • Late night jams among participants

Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday, May 21, 22 & 23

  • Body work: tai chi, yoga
  • Breakfast
  • Morning Gamalataki Workshops
  • Late morning: instrument practice
  • Lunch
  • Afternoon Sessions / Workshops  (combination of Master Class and others)
  • Late afternoon free time/individual lessons
  • Early evening meditation
  • Dinner
  • Evening interactive jam sessions with guiding artists and participants

Friday, May 24

  • Breakfast
  • Group photo
  • Farewell and Departure

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Guiding Artist Biographies

Oliver Lake 

Oliver Lake:”It’s all about choices,” states modern Renaissance Man Oliver Lake to explain his expansive artistic vision. An accomplished poet, painter and performance artist, Lake has published a book of poetry entitled Life Dance, has exhibited and sold a number of his unique painted-sticks at the Montclair Art Museum, and has toured the country with his one-man performance piece, Matador of 1st and 1st. But it’s his extraordinary talents as composer, saxophonist, flautist and bandleader that have brought him world-renown. Although his greatest reputation exists in the world of jazz, Lake’s amazingly eclectic musical approach is best expressed by his popular poem SEPARATION: put all my food on the same plate!

Whether composing major commissioned works for the Pro Musica Chamber Orchestra and the Brooklyn Philharmonic; creating chamber pieces for the Arditti and Flux String Quartets, the Amherst Sax Quartet and the San Francisco Contemporary Players; arranging for pop diva Bjork, rocker Lou Reed and rap group A Tribe Called Quest; collaborating with poets Amiri Baraka and Ntozake Shange, choreographers Ron Brown and Marlies Yearby, Native American vocalist Mary Redhouse, Korean kumongo player Jin Hi Kim, and Chinese bamboo flute player Shuni Tsou; doing unique performances with MacArthur Award recipients, actress/author Anna Devere Smith and writer/law professor/political commentator Patricia Williams; sharing thestage with hip-hop artist Mos Def and pop star Me’shell Ndegeocello; or leading his own Steel Quartet, Big Band and cooperative ensembles the World Saxophone Quartet and Trio 3; Oliver views it all as parts of the same whole. dixieland, be-bop, soul, rhythm & blues, cool school, swing, avant-garde jazz, free jazz, rock, jazz rock

Extremely few artists could embrace such a diverse array of musical styles and disciplines. Lake is not only able to thrive in all of these environments, but does so without distorting or diluting his own remarkable artistic identity. Part of this is due to his experience with the Black Artists Group (BAG), the legendary multi-disciplined and innovative St. Louis collective he co-founded with poets Ajule and Malinke, and musicians Julius Hemphill and Floyd La Flore over 35 years ago. But in reality, Oliver’s varied artistic interests go back even further than that.

Born in Marianna, Arkansas in 1942, Oliver moved to St. Louis at the age of two. He began drawing at the age of thirteen (and paints daily, using oil, acrylics, wood, canvas, and mixed media), and soon after began playing cymbals and bass drum in various drum and bugle corps. At 17, he began to take a serious interest in jazz. Like many other members of BAG and its Chicago-based sister organization, the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), Lake moved to New Yorkin the mid-’70s, working the fertile ground of the downtown loft scene and quicklyestablishing himself as one of its most adventurous and multi-faceted artists.

While he has continued to tour regularly with his own groups, collaborations and guest appearances – in the last three months of 2003, he performed in Europe, Japan andvarious U.S. cities – Oliver recognized the changing trends and new challenges facing creative artists, especially those working in the jazz tradition. Always a strong proponent of artist self-empowerment and independence, in 1988 Lake founded Passin’ Thru, Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit, dedicated to fostering, promoting and advancing the knowledge, understanding and appreciation of jazz, new music and other disciplines in relation to music.A co-founder of the internationally acclaimed World Saxophone Quartet with Hemphill, Hamiet Bluiett and David Murray in 1977 (and recently celebrating its 30th anniversary with an album of Jimi Hendrix pieces for Justin Time Records), Oliver continued to work with the WSQ and his own various groups – including the groundbreaking roots/reggae ensemble Jump Up – and collaborating with many notable choreographers, poets and a veritable Who’s Who of the progressive jazz scene of the late 20th century, performing all over the U.S. as well as in Europe, Japan, the Middle East, Africa and Australia.

Under his artistic direction, Passin’ Thru has commissioned new works, sponsored performances by emerging artists, documented works by prominent artists, and has established on-going educational activities not only in its home base of New Jersey and New York, but also in Florida, Minnesota, Arizona and Pennsylvania, along with occasional activities in other locales all over the U.S. The organization also operates Passin’ Thru Records, which has recently issued its 12th recording (Dat Love by the Oliver Lake Steel Quartet). In addition to Oliver’s albums, ranging from solo to big band, Passin Thru has also issued recordings by the late, legendary multi-reed master Makanda Ken McIntyre, piano great John Hicks and the first recording by Lake’s mentor, St. Louis tenor sax giant Freddie Washington. A 13th album by renowned trombonist Craig Harris is scheduled for release in the spring of 2004.

 

Marilyn Crispell 

Marilyn Crispell is a graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music where she studied classical piano and composition, and has been a resident of Woodstock, New York since 1977 when she came to study and teach at the Creative Music Studio. She discovered jazz through the music of John Coltrane, Cecil Taylor and other contemporary jazz players and composers. For ten years she was a member of the Anthony Braxton Quartet and the Reggie Workman Ensemble and has been a member of the Barry Guy New Orchestra and guest with his London Jazz Composers Orchestra, as well as a member of the Henry Grimes Trio, Quartet Noir (with Urs Leimgruber, Fritz Hauser and Joelle Leandre), and Anders Jormin’s Bortom Quintet. In 2005 she performed and recorded with the NOW Orchestra in Vancouver, Canada and in 2006 she was co-director of the Vancouver Creative Music Institute and a faculty member at the Banff Centre International Workshop in Jazz.

Besides working as a soloist and leader of her own groups, Crispell has performed and recorded extensively with well-known players on the American and international jazz scene. She’s also performed and recorded music by contemporary composers Robert Cogan, Pozzi Escot, John Cage, Pauline Oliveros, Manfred Niehaus and Anthony Davis (including four performances of his opera “X” with the New York City Opera).

In addition to playing, she has taught improvisation workshops and given lecture/demonstrations at universities and art centers in the U.S., Europe, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, and has collaborated with videographers, filmmakers, dancers and poets. Crispell has been the recipient of three New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship grants (1988-1989, 1994-1995 and 2006-2007), a Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust composition commission (1988-1989), and a Guggenheim Fellowship (2005-2006). In 1996 she was given an Outstanding Alumni Award by the New England Conservatory, and in 2004, was cited as being one of their 100 most outstanding alumni of the past 100 years.

 

John Medeski 

Keyboard master John Medeski thrives on the unpredictable, a trait that has kept his work with the trailblazing trio Medeski Martin & Wood (MMW) fresh and surprising for more than twenty years. With A Different Time, his first solo piano project, Medeski once again takes his sound in a completely unexpected direction – unexpected even to him.

“I had a more eclectic record in mind,” Medeski says. “I wanted to put out something that would be more representative of what my live solo concerts are like.”

Instead, A Different Time (out April 9 – the first release on Sony Classical’s newly-revived OKeh Records imprint) is a far more introspective, meditative collection than fans of MMW’s lively, groove-driven music might expect. Consisting mostly of Medeski’s own compositions and improvisations, with a familiar spiritual and a Willie Nelson song added into the mix, the album presents a different side of Medeski’s prodigious artistry, one which he was initially reluctant to display.

“In all honesty, it was a little scary to put this out because it’s so meditative and contemplative,” Medeski admits. “I know it’s not what anybody’s expecting, but it’s a side of me that exists. It’s really raw and open, stripped of all hipness. But it’s made me a little less afraid to just drop into the moment and play what’s coming to me as opposed to something that I know will work, something that I know is cool, something that I know will have a certain effect. The whole point is to get lost in the music.”

Not just a first for Medeski, A Different Time also marks the return of the historic OKeh label, once home for such jazz pioneers as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, King Oliver, and Sidney Bechet. Sony Classical has revived the label as an outlet for new jazz releases by artists like Medeski, Bill Frisell, David Sanborn, and Bob James, among others to be announced. “At this point,” Medeski says, “after everything that’s gone on in the music business, it’s exciting that Sony has come around to releasing new creative music again. I like the energy of being part of something new.”

While he’s become better known for a more buoyant, organ-centric approach that melds free-wheeling jazz with jam band eclecticism, Medeski says that sitting alone at a piano feels natural, returning him to his earliest experiences at the keyboard. “I grew up playing piano my whole life,” he says, “so it feels like home to me.” He began playing more solo concerts in recent years, and decided it was time to document that aspect of his playing.

The album was recorded at Waterfront Studios, producer Henry Hirsch’s recording studio built within a 19th-century church in New York’s scenic Hudson Valley. For his solo debut, Medeski wanted to aim for a sound quality that approached his personal “Holy Grail,” the recordings that classical pianist Arthur Rubinstein made for RCA Records. Hirsch shared his admiration for those sessions, so Medeski spent several days recording on Waterfront’s nine-foot Steinway piano.

But Hirsch also encouraged Medeski to try the studio’s other piano, a 1924 Gaveau – a French piano made in a pre-modern style, akin to Chopin’s preferred model, the Pleyel. The instrument, as it turned out, was a revelation and made a profound impact on the music that came to be A Different Time. 

“The Gaveau required a very delicate, controlled touch,” Medeski explains. “It is much harder to get a good sound out of it than it is on a regular piano. You have to use a lot of control; touch makes a huge difference and when you play delicately you can get a lot of nuance and really make this instrument sing. I tried a lot of things that had never worked for me before, and when I went back and listened to all of the recordings, that stuff stuck out as the most unique.”

The entirety of A Different Time was recorded on the Gaveau, with minimal electronics in order to capture the instrument’s full dynamic range. The sessions were undertaken late at night, when outside noise was at a minimum and a more crepuscular mood settled over the church. As Medeski writes in his liner notes, he hopes that listeners approach the album in the same atmosphere, at a time “when social responsibilities are over, when the political questions of the day have been dealt with, when all gossip has come to an end, when all needs and wants have been put to momentary rest, when all plans have been made, when you are tired of words, and you are ready to yield to the sounds of these simple contemplations for the Gaveau.”

The album begins with the title track, a stark “spontaneous composition” improvised by Medeski at the Gaveau. The name has several connotations, evoking that night-time ambience but also harkening back to a time when records occupied a listener’s full attention, before the multifarious distractions of the modern world. “There was a time when people used to sit down and listen to music, when it wasn’t just the soundtrack to your life,” Medeski says. “I remember sitting in a room with a group of people, experiencing music together, at a time when we as human beings really got lost in the sound.”

A Different Time offers a sustained opportunity to become lost in Medeski’s deeply personal sound, presenting an intensely focused experience of keen emotional virtuosity. The selection ranges from the tender Willie Nelson ballad “I’m Falling in Love Again,” a piece which Medeski has long wanted to record and which finally found its best expression through the Gaveau; to “His Eye Is On the Sparrow,” a traditional spiritual that Medeski approaches with a lush reverence.

“Ran” is another tune for which Medeski has long sought the proper context, the album’s sole through-composed piece. The wistful “Otis,” which closes the album, was originally recorded on Notes From the Underground, MMW’s 1992 debut album. The sing-song “Waiting at the Gate” dates back even further, to a musical Medeski wrote in his teens. “It’s just a little tune that I wrote when I was a kid and never played for anybody,” Medeski laughs. “Ever.”

The heart-breakingly gorgeous “Luz Marina” was written for Mama Kia, the founder of an orphanage in Peru who passed away in 2010. Luz Marina was the name of her first adopted child, who died at a tender age. Medeski sought to depict Mama Kia’s inspirational and generous spirit through the piece. The final two pieces are both improvisations: “Graveyard Fields,” which shares the deceptively morbid name of a bucolic area in North Carolina, and the darkly tinged “Lacrima,” more aptly named for the Italian word for “tear.”

The fact that he didn’t try out the Gaveau until he thought he’d already gotten a full album in the can took a considerable amount of pressure off of Medeski’s shoulders, opening him up to the more naked, vulnerable sound of the album.

“I was just playing music,” he says. It was just about dealing with the instrument and the room and making the music that felt good. I just got lost in the sound, and that’s really the ultimate goal anytime you sit down to play.”

 

Harvey Sorgen 

Harvey Sorgen’s vast and diverse career as a drummer/percussionist has given him a unique ability to fit in and play with artists of virtually every type of music. His orchestral concept on and off the instrument has distinguished Harvey as one of the truly unique drummers of our time. Expanding the boundaries of sound and color on the drum set, Harvey has had the opportunity to perform and record with a vast array of musicians, including: Hot Tuna, Ahmad Jamal, Michelle Shocked, Karl Berger, Paul Simon, Dewey Redman, Dave Douglas, David Sancious, Mark Feldman, Zakir Hussain, Giovanni Hidalgo, Leo Smith, Cameron Brown, Steve Swell, Anthony Braxton, Bruce Hornsby, Derek Trucks, Bill Frisell, Bob Weir, NRBQ, Phil Lesh, Greg Allman, Tony Levin, Jack DeJohnette, Garth Hudson and Jimmy Vivino, among many others.

Harvey has also written and performed pieces for film and the stage, including a solo percussion piece for the New Day Repertoire Theater’s version of “Antigone” and has conducted workshops throughout the world, from the University of Graz (Austria) and Jazz Initiative Marburg (Germany) to the University of Michigan and Virginia Commonwealth University. He is also an accomplished audio engineer and editor, having worked at the legendary Dreamland Recording Studio. Past projects include re-mastering of the entire ESP record label. Harvey’s first instructional video ” Drumming Made Easy ” is currently available worldwide from Homespun Tapes Inc. / Hal Leonard publishing. Harvey Sorgen also appears on Jack DeJohnette’s ” Musical Expression On The Drum Set” and Jorma Kaukonen’s ” The Electric Guitar Of Jorma Kaukonen “ DVD’s also available from Homespun Tapes Inc.

 

Thomas Buckner

For more than 40 years, baritone Thomas Buckner has dedicated himself to the world of new and improvised music. Buckner has collaborated with a host of new music composers including Robert AshleyNoah CreshevskyTom HamiltonEarl HowardMatthias Kaul, Leroy Jenkins, Bun Ching LamAnnea Lockwood, Roscoe Mitchell, Phill NiblockWadada Leo Smith, Chinary Ung, Christian Wolff and many others. He has made appearances at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, the Herbst Theatre, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Ostrava Days Festival, the Prague Spring Festival, and the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki. Buckner is featured on over 40 recordings, including 6 of his own solo albums. His most recent solo recording “New Music for Baritone & Chamber Ensemble” includes works by Annea Lockwood, Tania Leon, and Petr Kotik. He also appears in the newly released CD/DVD “Kirili et le Nymphéas (Hommage à Monet)”. This recording documents the latest in his ongoing series of collaborations between the sculptor Alain Kirili and improvising musicians and dancers. For the past twenty years, Buckner has co-produced the Interpretations series in New York City. He also created the Mutable Music record label to produce new recordings and reissue some important historic recordings, previously unavailable in CD format.

 

Steve Gorn 

Steve Gorn, whose flute is featured on the 2011 Grammy winning recording, “Miho – Journey to the Mountain,” with the Paul Winter Consort, and the Academy Award winning Documentary film, Born into Brothels, has performed Indian Classical Music and new American Music on the bansuri bamboo flute, soprano saxophone and clarinet in concerts and festivals throughout the world. He is also featured on Angelique Kidjo’s Grammy nominated cd, “Oyo”

His unique blend of Indian music and contemporary world music can be heard on recordings with Paul Simon, Glen Velez, Jack DeJohnette, Paul Winter, Krishna Das, Jai Uttal, Tony Levin, Adam Rudolph, Layne Redmond, Richie Havens, Alessandra Belloni, Badal Roy, Simon Shaheen, Deepak Chopra, Robert Bly, Coleman Barks, and numerous Indian musicians. His numerous recordings include Luminous Ragas, the landmark Indian-Jazz fusion recording, Asian Journal, Pranam a jugalbandi with Barun Kumar Pal playing hansaveena, and Samir Chatterjee, tabla. His latest recording are Rasika, with tabla by Samir Chatterjee, and Illumination, with Nepali flutist, Manose.

 

Steven Bernstein

Steven Bernstein is a trumpeter/slide trumpeter, bandleader, arranger, and composer who lives outside of musical convention. He has released four critically acclaimed CDs; Diaspora Soul, Diaspora Blues (featuring the Sam Rivers trio), Diaspora Hollywood, andDiaspora Suite. All four are on John Zorn’s Tzadik label.

His band Sex Mob has been together since 1995 touring the world, winning numerous awards, and has had their music featured on MTV, Saturday Night Live and NPR. Sexotica, recorded for Thirsty Ear’s Blue series, was nominated for a Grammy in 2006. Their most recent CD, Sex Mob meets Medeskiwas recorded live at the Willisau Jazz Festival.

His nine-piece ensemble, the Millennial Territory Orchestra, has released two CDs, MTO Vol 1 and We Are MTO. Their upcoming CD, MTO Plays Sly, features Bernie Worrell, Vernon Reid, Antony, Martha Wainwright, Dean Bowman, Sandra St. Victor and Shilpa Ray, and is slated for a September 2011 release. MTO was formed in 1999 for a series of Midnight shows at Tonic, and spent a year and a half long residency at the Jazz Standard. Bernstein also arranged and co-produced Baby Loves Jazz,featuring vocalists Sharon Jones and Babi Floyd, along with keyboard master John Medeski. The CD is available on Verve records.

Bernstein was the musical director for I’m Your Man, a documentary on Leonard Cohen that focuses on a tribute concert held at the Sydney Opera house, released by Lions Gate films in spring 2006. He was the musical director for the live sequences in the 2009 Bill Withers documentary Still Bill. Other DVDreleases include Solos, originally a Canadian Television program featuring solo performances by musicians including Andrew Hill, Joe Lovano, and John Scofield, as well as Lou Reed’s Berlin (directed by Julian Schnabel) and Levon Helm Ramble at The Ryman. Bernstein was also the subject of a feature entitled “Creative Spaces” on NPR’s “All Things Considered,” and was interviewed by Terry Gross onNPR in 2002.

Since November 2004 Bernstein has been a member of the Levon Helm band, playing at the Midnight Rambles in Levon’s home in Woodstock. Bernstein wrote horn arrangements for Levon Helm’s Grammy winning 2009 recording Electric Dirt, as well as Bill Frissel’s Grammy winning 2004 recordingUnspeakable. Other arranging credits include Lou Reed, Rufus Wainwright, Marianne Faithfull, Elton John, and Marvin Pontiac.

In 1992, musical iconoclast Hal Willner produced the eponymous debut CD by Spanish Fly, a cooperative trio with Bernstein, slide guitarist Dave Tronzo and tubaist Marcus Rojas, and they have been collaborating ever since.

Bernstein has worked as musical director on many Hal Willner projects, including tributes to Leonard Cohen, Doc Pomus, and Harold Arlen, and created the music for Robert Altman’s film Kansas City. He was also the musical director for the touring version of the Kansas City band, which included David “Fathead” Newman, Don Byron, James Carter, Christian McBride, and Nicholas Payton.

During his 10 years as a member of John Lurie’s Lounge Lizards he arranged the music for Get Shorty, Clay Pigeons, Fishing With John and many more film, television and commercial projects with Mr. Lurie.

For composer/Foetus mastermind Jim Thirwell, Bernstein arranged Steroid Maximus to be performed live by a 21 piece ensemble.

Bernstein’s work as a composer includes the documentaries Keep the River On Your Right andBalloonhat, Nickelodeon’s hit TV show The Backyardigans (including an ANNIE nomination for his score to “International Super Spy”), live scores to silent Laurel & Hardy films, theatre scores for Mae West’s Sex and Trouble in Paradise, dance pieces for Alvin Ailey, Body Vox, the Donald Byrd Dance Company, the Flying Karamazov Brothers and the San Francisco Ballet, and commercial jingles.

Bernstein has played trumpet with a diverse group of artists including My Morning Jacket, Linda Ronstadt, David Murray, David Berger, Digable Planets, Sting, Medeski Martin and Wood, Courtney Love, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Don Byron and Mocean Worker.

Awards include:

*DOWNBEAT CRITICS POLL 2006 (#1 Rising Star Arranger, #4 Rising Star Trumpeter)
*DOWNBEAT CRITICS POLL 2005 (#1 Rising Star Arranger)
*DOWNBEAT CRITICS POLL 2004 (#1 Arranger, #2 Big Band – Millennial Territory Orchestra)
*JAZZ JOURNALISTS ASSOCIATION 2003 (Rare Brass)
*DOWNBEAT CRITICS POLL 2002 (Sex Mob #1 Beyond Group, #1 Acoustic Jazz Group)

 

Dave Douglas

Dave Douglas arguably became the most original trumpeter/composer of his generation. Douglas‘ stylistic range is broad yet unaffected; his music is not a pastiche, but rather a personal aesthetic that reflects a wide variety of interests. He explicitly cites such diverse influences as Igor StravinskyStevie Wonder, andJohn Coltrane. As a composer, Douglas adapts and synthesizes unusual forms and creates his own out of disparate elements. As a trumpeter, he possesses a comprehensive jazz technique; certainly one hears the ghost of Lester Bowie in Douglas‘ expressive manipulations of timbre and pitch, but more pronounced is the integration of distinctive compositional and improvisational conceptions that ultimately defines his work.

Douglas grew up in the New York City area. He started playing piano at the age of five, then trombone at seven before discovering the trumpet at nine. He learned jazz harmony in high school and began playing improvised music as an exchange student in Barcelona, Spain. From 1981 to 1983 he studied in Boston, first at the Berklee School of Music, then the New England Conservatory. He moved to New York City in 1984, where he attended New York University and studied with Carmine Caruso. In 1987, he toured Europe with Horace Silver. The early ’90s saw Douglas begin to record in earnest; he led or co-led dates for the Hat Art, Soul Note, New World, and Arabesque labels. His various bands included the Tiny Bell Trio, a self-described “jazz-Balkan-improv” group with drummer Jim Black and guitarist Brad Shepik(who used the surname Schoeppach at the time); his String Group, which included violinist Mark Feldman, cellist Erik Friedlander, bassist Mark Dresser, and drummer Michael Sarin; and his Quartetand Sextet, which included drummer Joey Baron. Also busy as a sideman, he could be heard during this period on recordings by Patricia BarberMyra MelfordAnthony Braxton, and John Zorn (particularly the latter’s original Masada quartet), among others, and the trumpeter has continued such collaborations through to the end of the new millennium’s first decade.

Douglas began recording for RCA in 2000 with a tribute to jazz pianistMary Williams titled Soul on Soul, a Down Beat Album of the Year award-winner that markedly enhanced the trumpeter’s profile on the jazz scene. That same year A Thousand Evenings, featuring accordionist Guy Klucevsek, was released, followed by El Trilogy andWitness in 2001. It was with Witness that Douglas began to broaden his already eclectic scope, incorporating electronic-savvy improvisers likeJamie Saft and Ikue Mori, as he had first begun to investigate with the samplers of Anthony Coleman and Yuka Honda on 1997’s Sanctuary. His next album, The Infinite, featured a more familiar sound but surprising covers of songs by Rufus Wainwright and BjörkFreak In, a more electronic-oriented effort, was released in 2003.

Douglas began his own Greenleaf Music label in 2003 and introduced it with the Mountain Passages album, released in early 2005 by a new aggregation, Dave Douglas & Nomad. Next came yet another new ensemble for the trumpeter, Keystone, which released an eponymous CD/DVD tribute to Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle produced by Douglas andDavid Torn, also in 2005. The Dave Douglas Quintet (featuring an electrified Uri Caine on Fender Rhodes) releases Meaning and Mysteryand Live at the Jazz Standard arrived in 2006 and 2007, followed by the Keystone group’s Moonshine in 2008. In 2009, Douglas returned with Spirit Moves by his latest grouping, the brass ensemble Brass Ecstasy.

In 2010, he collaborated with experimental filmmaker Bill Morrison to reinterpret the film Frankenstein for its 100th anniversary. Morrison recontextualized the film using new, archival, and distressed footage, while Douglas wrote an original score. The project was entitled Spark of Being. In addition to a soundtrack of the same name, Douglas and his Keystone group recorded two more albums and created a box set, though titles were available individually as well. Spark of Being: Expand was released in August of 2010, and featured the band playing extended but “straight” versions of the cues used in the soundtrack. The final volume, Spark of Being: Burst, included themes recorded during the original soundtrack sessions, but were never used in the film. It followed in September of that year.

In 2011, Douglas issued three “EPs” on Greenleaf Music: the first, entitled Rare Metals, showcased five tunes by Brass Ecstasy; the second, Orange Afternoons, showcased a quintet with Ravi ColtraneVijay Iyer,Linda Oh, and Marcus Gilmore. The final disc, Bad Mango, featuredDouglas‘ So Percussion group. The three titles were originally issued only as digital downloads, but were assembled for a physical CD release in box form in November. In 2012, Douglas released a new quintet offering entitled Be Still. The album was a collection of new tunes and hymns that featured vocalist Aoife O’Donovan in the group’s lineup.

 

Karl Berger, PhD
 — Composer/Arranger/Conductor/Pianist/Vibraphonist/Consultant 

Founder and director of the nonprofit Creative Music Foundation, Inc., and creative leader of the legendary Creative Music Studio, Karl Berger is dedicated to the research of the power of music and sound and the elements common to all of the world’s music forms. In addition to his composing and playing, Karl is known around the world for educational presentations through workshops, concerts, recordings, and with a growing network of artists and CMS members worldwide.

Karl Berger is a six time winner of the Downbeat Critics Poll as a jazz soloist, recipient of numerous Composition Awards (commissions by the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, the Rockefeller Foundation, European Radio and Television: WDR, NDR, SWF, Radio France, Rai Italy. SWF-Prize 1994). Professor of Composition, Artist-in- Residence at universities, schools and festivals worldwide, PhD in Music Esthetics.

Karl Berger became noted for his innovative arrangements for recordings by Jeff Buckley (“Grace”), Natalie Merchant (“Ophelia”), Better Than Ezra, The Cardigans, Jonatha Brooke, Buckethead, Bootsie Collins, The Swans, Sly + Robbie, Angelique Kidjo and others; and for his collaborations with producers Bill Laswell, Alan Douglas (“Operazone”), Peter Collins, Andy Wallace, Craig Street, Alain Mallet, Malcolm Burn, Bob Marlett and many others in Woodstock, New York City, Los Angeles, Tokyo, London, Paris and Rome.

He recorded and performed with Don Cherry, Lee Konitz, John McLaughlin, Gunther Schuller, the Mingus Epitaph Orchestra, Dave Brubeck, Ingrid Sertso, Dave Holland, Ed Blackwell, Ray Anderson, Carlos Ward, Pharoah Sanders, Blood Ulmer, Hozan Yamamoto and many others at festivals and concerts in the US, Canada, Europe, Africa, India, Phillippines, Japan, Mexico and Brazil.

His recordings and arrangements appear on the Atlantic, Axiom, Black Saint, Blue Note, Capitol, CBS, Columbia Double Moon, Douglas Music, Elektra, EMI, Enja, Island, JVC, Knitting Factory, In&Out, MCA, Milestone, Polygram, Pye, RCA, SONY, Stockholm, Vogue and others.

 

Ingrid Sertso, Vocalist, Poet 

Through her work with such avant-jazz musicians as Don Cherry and Karl Berger, Ingrid Sertso established herself as a captivating, adventurous vocalist, capable of blending jazz, African, South American and other worldbeat influences into a distinctive, hypnotic sound.

Although Sertso didn’t become well-known until the release of Dance with It in 1994, she spent over 20 years honing her art. During the late ’60s, she lived in Europe, leading her own trios and performing with the likes of Eric Dolphy, Don Cherry, Steve Lacy, Karl Berger and Leo Wright; she also worked as a music teacher at several institutions in Europe. In 1972, she became a permanent resident of the United States and she released her first album, We Are You, on Calig Records. Over the next few years she taught, while she performed in North America and Europe with the likes of Cherry, Ed Blackwell, Lee Konitz, Sam Rivers, Jimmy Giuffre, Bob Moses, Dave Holland, Perry Robinson and Jumma Santos. In 1974, she released Kalaparush on Trio Records in Japan. It was followed in 1975 by Peace Church Concerts on India Navigation/CMC Records.

In 1975, Sertso became a faculty member at the Naropa Institute in Boulder, Colorado. She stayed there through 1975 and 1976, before moving to the Banff Centre of Fine Arts in Calgary, Canada. She had two residencies at Banff before moving to the Creative Music Studio in Woodstock, New York, where she became the co-director. While working at the Creative Music Studio, she began singing in the Art of Improvisation with Berger and David Inzenon. In 1979, she toured major European cities as a solo artists, supported by the Woodstock Workshop Orchestra. She also released an album on MPS Records that year.

During the early ’80s, Sertso remained a co-director at the Creative Music Studio, while continuing to record and perform with a variety of musicians, including such mainstays as Don Cherry and Karl Berger, as well as Paulo Moura, Nana Vasconcelos, Steve Gorn, Dan Brubeck and Mike Richmond. In 1984, she performed with the Music Universe Orchestra at the Kool Festival in New York and released a duet album, Changing the Time, with Berger on Horo Records in Italy. She also toured Europe twice during this time and she also toured West Africa with Olatunji and Aiyb Dieng.

Sertso’s career picked up momentum during the latter half of the ’90s. She held a series of concerts and workshops in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and she regularly tour the US on club and festival circuit. Sertso also toured Europe twice and sang solo vocals on Berger’s orchestral ballet, The Bird. She was one of the co-leaders of Rhythm Changes, who released the Jazzdance album on ITM Records. During these five years, she also performed and recorded with a variety of artists, including Pauline Oliveros, Lee Konitz, Frank Luther, Anthony Cox, Leroy Jenkins, Jimmy Cobber, Linda Montano and Karl Berger.

In 1990, Sertso catapulted back into the mainstream jazz spotlight through her version “Until the Rain Comes” on Don Cherry’s Multi Kulti album. Shortly afterward, she began working on a new album, but she became sidetracked by collaborating with Karl Berger and guitarist Paul Koji Shigihara. The trio blended original compositions with Sertso’s poetry, improvisations and interpretations of traditional tune. Sertso also regularly performed poetry readings at the Tinker Street Cafe in Woodstock and the Knitting Factory in New York, and she also regularly played clubs along the Northeast coast. In 1994, she released her comeback album Dance with It, which earned postitive reviews. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine (All Music Guide)

 

Tani Tabbal 

Tani Tabbal began playing and exploring drums at a very young age, only to become a young professional, performing with Oscar Brown Jr. in many of his ground breaking plays. From there, Tabbal toured and become part of the legendary Sun Ra’s ‘Arkestra’, and Phil Coran’s ‘Artistic Heritage Ensemble’.

Tani became known for his exceptional fluidity with odd and mixed meters. His passion for the avant-garde and in pushing the jazz medium along with blending world rhythms, brought him recognition among the musical giants. He has performed with Roscoe Mitchell, David Murray, Jackie McLean, Muhal Richard Abrams, Cassandra Wilson, Dewey Redman, Karl Berger, Geri Allen, James Carter, Howard Johnson, Pharoah Sanders to name just a few, and is on over sixty five recordings.

 

Don Byron 

For over two decades, Don Byron, a recipient of the first Doris Duke Performing Artist Award, has been a singular voice in an astounding range of musical contexts, exploring widely divergent traditions while continually striving for what he calls “a sound above genre.”

As clarinetist, saxophonist, composer, arranger, and social critic, he redefines every genre of music he plays, be it classical, salsa, hip-hop, funk, rhythm & blues, klezmer, or any jazz style from swing and bop to cutting-edge downtown improvisation.  He has been consistently voted best clarinetist by critics and readers alike in leading international music journals since being named “Jazz Artist of the Year” by Down Beatin 1992. Acclaimed as much for his restless creativity as for his unsurpassed virtuosity as a player, Byron has presented a multitude of projects at major music festivals around the world.

Beginnings:  Born and raised in the Bronx, New York, Byron was exposed to a wide variety of music by his father, who played bass in calypso bands, and his mother, a pianist. His taste was further refined by trips to the symphony and ballet and by many hours spent listening to Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis and Machito recordings. He formalized his music education by studying classical clarinet with Joe Allard while playing and arranging salsa numbers for high school bands on the side. He later studied with George Russell in the Third Stream Department of the New England Conservatory of Music and, while in Boston, also performed with Latin and jazz ensembles.

Collaborations: His artistic collaborations include performances and recordings with Mario Bauza, the Duke Ellington Orchestra, John Hicks, Tom Cora, Bill Frisell, Vernon Reid, Marc Ribot, Cassandra Wilson, Hamiet Bluiett, Anthony Braxton, Geri Allen, Hal Willner, Marilyn Crispell, Reggie Workman, Craig Harris,  David Murray, Leroy Jenkins, Bobby Previte, Gerry Hemingway, DD Jackson, Douglas Ewart, Brandon Ross,  Ed Neumeister, Tom Pierson, Steve Coleman, Living Colour, Ralph Peterson, Uri Caine, Mandy Patinkin, Steve Lacy, the Kansas City All-Stars, the Bang On A Can All-Stars, Medeski Martin & Wood, Angelique Kidjo, Carole King, Daniel Barenboim, Salif Keita, the Atlanta Symphony, Klangforum Wien, Joe Henry, Paul Auster, Meshell Ndegeocello, Allen Toussaint, and many others.

Compositions: Byron has written arrangements of Stephen Sondheim’s Broadway musicals and original scores for the silent filmScar of Shame and a 1961 television episode by comedy pioneer Ernie Kovacs. He wrote and performed music for the dance companies of Donald Byrd, Bebe Miller, Mark Dendy, and Ellen Sinopoli, and was featured in Robert Altman’s movie Kansas City and the Paul Auster filmLulu on the Bridge. He has composed the soundtracks for several documentary films, including director Joel Katz’s acclaimed “Strange Fruit” about the history of the anti-lynching song made famous by Billie Holiday, and for “Red-Tailed Angels,” a film about the Tuskegee Airmen. His most recent soundtracks are “White,” a study of race and child adoption, and “Joe Papp in Five Acts,” a tribute to New York’s iconic theater impresario.

Composing commissions include “Spin,” a duet for violin and piano premiered at the Library of Congress; “Red,” a big band suite premiered at the Monterey Jazz Festival, two string quartets – “There Goes the Neighborhood” for Kronos, and “Four Thoughts on Marvin Gaye” for Ethel. Other recent concert works are “Tide,” a mixed sextet premiered at The Egg in Albany for the Quadricentennial Celebration of the Hudson River Valley, and “7 Etudes For Piano,” commissioned by pianist Lisa Moore.

Teaching: Don Byron is also a gifted teacher, who has led residencies at the University of California San Diego, the University of Nevada Reno, Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Columbia University. From 2005-2009, he was a Visiting Associate Professor at The State University of New York (Albany) where he taught theory, saxophone, improvisation, and composition. In 2007/08, he also taught at MIT as a Martin Luther King Visiting Professor.

Awards: The album Ivey-Divey received a Grammy nomination for best instrumental solo and was voted Album of the Year 2004 by Jazz Times Magazine. In 2007, Byron was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and a United States Artists Prudential Fellowship. In 2009, he was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for composition for his “7 Etudes for Piano” and won “The Samuel Baber Rome Prize for Composition,” which came with a one-year residency at the American Academy in Rome where he began work on his first opera. In April 2012, joining the First Class of Doris Duke Artists, Don Byron received the Duke Performing Artist Award.

 

Mark Helias 

Mark Helias is a renowned bassist and composer who has performed throughout the world for more than three decades. After his studies at Rutgers University (B.A. 1974) and The Yale School of Music (M.M. 1976), he began his international career in the Anthony Braxton Quartet. Up to the present time he has performed with a panoply of world class artists including: Edward Blackwell, Anthony Davis, Dewey Redman, Marcel Khalife, Abbey Lincoln, Oliver Lake, Andrew Cyrille, Marilyn Crispell, Julius Hemphill, Don Byron, Bobby Bradford, Barry Altshul, Ray Anderson, Don Cherry, Cecil Taylor, and Gerry Hemingway.

A prolific composer, Helias has written music for two feature films as well as chamber pieces and works for large ensemble and big band. His orchestra piece “Stochasm” was premiered by the American Composers Orchestra in June of 2011. He has produced many recordings for other artists including Ray Anderson, Tony Malaby, Bobby Previte, Jerome Harris, and Mark Dresser.

Twelve albums of his music have been released since 1984, including “Split Image”, “The Current Set” (1987), “Desert Blue” (1989) “Attack The Future”, (1992) “Loopin’ the Cool” (1995), “Fictionary” (1998), “Come Ahead Back” (1998) “New School” (2001). “Verbs of Will” (2004), “Atomic Clock” (2006), “Strange Unison” (2008). His latest CD, “Explicit”, will be released September, 2011 on the French label Futura Marge.

His trio, Open Loose with Tony Malaby and Tom Rainey, has become an archetypal improvising ensemble on the New York scene. He continues performing and recording with BassDrumBone, a three decade long collaboration with Gerry Hemingway and Ray Anderson. Mr. Helias performs solo bass concerts and can also be heard in the innovative bass duo, “The Marks Brothers”, with fellow bassist Mark Dresser. He teaches at Sarah Lawrence College, The New School University and SIM (School for Improvisational Music).

 

Ken Filiano 

Bass player, composer, improviser, Ken FIliano has been performing throughout the world for thirty years, collaborating with leading artists in multiple genres, fusing the rich traditions of the double bass with his own seemingly limitless inventiveness. Ken leads two quartets, Quantum Entanglements, and Baudalino’s Dilemma (Vinny Golia, Warren Smith, Michael TA Thompson), and is a co-leader of The Steve Adams/Ken Filiano Duo and TranceFormation (Connie Crothers, Andrea Wolper.) His extensive discography includes a solo bass CD, “subvenire” (NineWinds), and “Dreams From a Clown Car” (Clean Feed), which presents his compositions for his quartet, Quantum Entanglements (Michael Attias, Tony Malaby, Michael TA Thompson). Ken has performed and/or recorded with Karl Berger, Bobby Bradford, Anthony Braxton, Connie Crothers Quartet, Bill Dixon, Ted Dunbar, Giora Feidman Quartet, Vinny Golia ensembles, Taylor Ho Bynum, Jason Kao Hwang, Joseph Jarman, Raul Juanena, Joelle Leandre, Frank London, Tina Marsh, Warne Marsh, Dom Minasi, Barre Phillips, Roswell Rudd, ROVA Saxophone Qt., Paul Smoker, Fay Victor Ensemble, Pablo Zielger, and many more. Ken is on the teaching roster at the New School in New York, and is a guest artist lecturer at School of Visual Arts and Hunter College (New York). He teaches master classes in bass and improvisation, and has a private bass studio in Brooklyn.

 

 

Ken Wessel 

Ken Wessel is a versatile, sensitive and soulful guitarist and composer. A vital and personal voice on the jazz guitar, Wessel has been involved in projects playing jazz, ranging from straight-ahead to free music. Ken is also very interested in creating and investigating points of intersection between jazz and Indian music and has performed and recorded with musicians from various parts of the globe. He has performed in 26 countries at major jazz festivals, concert halls and in radio and television appearances.

Wessel worked with revolutionary jazz artist Ornette Coleman for over 12 years (1988-2000), touring the world as a member of Prime Time, Ornette’s groundbreaking ensemble. Ken can be heard on Ornette Coleman’s critically acclaimed Polygram/Verve CD, Tone Dialing. Performing “Skies of America,” Ornette Coleman’s seminal work for symphony orchestra and jazz ensemble, Ken has appeared with Kurt Masur and the New York Philharmonic and London’s Philharmonia Orchestra.
 He has worked with artists from different shades of the jazz spectrum, including John Abercrombie, David Liebman, Gloria Lynne, Arthur and Red Prysock, Karl Berger, Steve Gorn, Adam Rudolph, Hamid Drake, Donald Fagen, Steve Turre and Johnny Hartmann.

Ken has a strong interest in world music, particulary with North Indian music, and he has performed with Debashish Bhattacharya, Karaikudi Mani, V.M. Bhatt, Samir Chatterjee and others. Wessel co-leads a trio with jazz tabla master Badal Roy and bassist Stomu Takeishi. Their CD, Daybreak, was included in JAZZIZ magazine’s Top 10 Critic’s Picks of 1998. They have performed together extensively throughout North America. In 1995, Ken and Badal toured India and the U.S. with their composition, “Testimony,” which was commissioned by the Battery Dance Company. As a U.S. Jazz Ambassador, Ken has toured South Asia and South America, visiting India, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Bengladesh and Venezuela in 2002-03.
 He is an active composer (he has received numerous “Meet the Composer” grants) and his original music has an organic and evocative quality. Ken’s quartet with Joel Frahm (sax), Brad Jones (bass) and Kenny Wolleson (drums) has a CD in the works which will be released soon. His recent trio recording, Jawboning (CIMP), with bassist, Ken Filiano and drummer, Lou Grassi investigates the boundaries between freedom and structure. A dedicated jazz educator, Ken is currently on the faculties of the Music Conservatory of Westchester and Rutgers University. He has given clinics and Master classes at numerous institutions in the U.S. and overseas, including Yale University, Manhattan School of Music, Mahaidol University in Thailand, Music Academy in Oslo, and Columbia University.

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About Full Moon Resort

Full Moon, located one half hour west of Woodstock, New York, “the most famous small town in the world,” is a year-round mountain resort located in the heart of the “Forever Wild” Catskill Forest Preserve.  Dedicated to the celebration of nature, music and the arts, this one hundred-acre wonderland of mountains, fields, and streams is a world of its own.

Full Moon is an alternative to more traditional country inns and resorts – with educational, recreational and artistic workshops, weekend-long destination country weddings, cutting-edge music camps, and art exhibits all part of its magical landscape.

“Music and art in nature” is a central theme at Full Moon Resort. Music is always in the air with the Music Masters Camp series, a special mid-week interactive musical experience with world renowned artists – complete with superb dining, comfortable country inn accommodations, and camping options.

Lovingly prepared, fresh, healthy cuisine served by a friendly, professional staff is the trademark of Full Moon Catering.  The menus offer a full range of possibilities – hot buffet breakfasts and lunches, down-home country barbeques …tantalizing hors d’oeuvres and formal gourmet dinners in the Tent Pavilion.  Fresh, natural ingredients (often organic) are the common thread throughout.

Accommodations are charming in their simplicity, with guest rooms available in a variety of lodges  – some in a simple B&B style with shared hallway baths and others with private bath options.

In all, Full Moon Resort, with its picturesque grounds, cozy guest accommodations, excellent cuisine and friendly, professional staff, sets the stage for highly memorable experiences for those attending the Music Masters Camps.

Full Moon contact info:
Telephone: 845-254-8009
Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm (EST)

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FAQ

When will my deposit be run?
Your deposit will be run at the time of your registration.

What gear do I need?
Bring your instrument(s) if they fit! Amps are not required. For more information, email music@fullmoonresort.com to see what will be provided.

Can I still come if I’m not a musician?
Non-musicians are more than welcome and encouraged to attend.

What skill level is required to attend?
Classes and curriculum are developed to accommodate all ranges of playing. All classes are optional and open to everyone.

Is there an age requirement?
No. Minors are required to submit a parent/legal guardian consent form.

Are meals included?
Three gourmet meals a day and snacks are included in your tuition.

If I want to bring my spouse, but they don’t want to attend classes, can I?
Yes. In order to bring a non-participant, you would need to purchase a “single occupancy” package. Non-participants have access to all meals, but no classes or workshops. Additional fees apply.

When is check in and check out?
Check in is at 3pm on arrival day and check out is at 11am on departure day. Due to Full Moon’s busy event calendar, it is generally not possible to check in early or check out late.

How do I get there?
Please see the ‘Directions/Transportation’ section below.

Is there cell phone reception at camp?
There is no cell phone reception at Full Moon Resort.  Complimentary phone service for all calls within the U.S. is available at all times at the Inn. Also, there is complimentary Wi-Fi available throughout the facility.

How do I make my final payment?
Your final payment will be automatically run on the credit card on file on the due date noted in your registration form. You may provide an alternative method of payment as long as it is received before the due date.

Can I take photos, video or audio recordings?
Yes. You may be required to sign a waiver stating all recordings, footage and/or photos will be used strictly for personal use and not commercially.

What is the weather like at camp?
Weather in the Catskills varies. In the spring, you can expect warm days (low 60s to upper 70s) and cooler nights (lower 40s to lower 60s).  Click here for updated weather information.

What do you suggest I bring with me?
Audio recording devices
Camera
Clothes & Toiletries (toothbrush, soap, shampoo etc…)
Tent Campers- don’t forget towels, sleeping bags, tarps, etc.!
Insect Repellent
Swimwear
Flashlight
Writing Utensils & Note Paper
Water bottle
Cash for evening bars (There is no ATM on-site.)

Do you provide equipment storage for tent campers?
This can be arranged on an as needed basis.

Can I select my own roommate?
Yes – if that person is signed up as well. We cannot hold a spot for someone unless they have already registered.

How does the facility select my roommate?
Full Moon Resort selects roommates based on age and gender. You will always be placed with a same-sex roommate.

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Pricing and Registration

Camp Packages are All-Inclusive!

Monday to Friday you will have access to all workshops, seminars, gourmet meals, performances, and camp activities. The only thing you have to do after signing up is get here!

All camp activities will be held at Full Moon Resort. Full Moon features an eclectic array of comfortable, rustic country-inn accommodations including simple B&B style guest rooms with shared hallway baths and guest rooms with private baths. “Primitive” campsites are also available. All accommodations are just steps away from daily music camp activities. The grounds offer one hundred acres of meadows, forests and streams providing a natural backdrop for an unforgettable, enriching experience.

Guest rooms at Full Moon do not have telephones, TV’s, air conditioning or daily housekeeping service. Wi-Fi, cable television and complimentary phone service are all available at the Inn (please bring a phone card for international calls).   Enjoy the spring-fed swimming pool, on-site access to the Esopus Creek, and explore the splendors of the Catskills on the nearby network of hiking trails.

Please Note: There is no cell phone reception at Full Moon Resort or in Big Indian.

Package Pricing
Note: Prices do not include applicable taxes

Full Moon Resort Accommodations:

Note: Prices include Full Moon Resort lodging, food and CMS workshops. Prices do not include applicable taxes.

New, reduced rates:

  • $595 Tent Camping
  • $895 Double Occupancy, Shared Bath
  • $995 Double Occupancy, Private Bath
  • $1,295 Single Occupancy, Shared Bath
  • $1,595 Single Occupancy, Private Bath

Registration, Payment and Cancellation Terms and Conditions:

Your decision to register for Full Moon Resort Music Masters Camps constitutes your acknowledgement of and consent to all of the registration, payment and cancellation terms and conditions listed below.

Registration and Payments:

  • All rates are per-person
  • All rates are subject to a 2% county tax, 8% New York State Tax and a 1.5% online registration fee
  • Upon registration, a non-refundable deposit of $350 is charged to your credit card
  • 100% of the remaining balance due is automatically charged to the credit card on file on March 20, 2013
  • Any registrations received after March 20, 2013, must be paid in full at the time of registration

Cancellation:

  • All payments and deposits are non-refundable
  • Cancellations received before March 20, 2013 will not be charged the remaining balance
  • Cancellations received after March 20, 2013 will be charged the full remaining balance

Due to the nature of our events and strict cancellation policies, Creative Environments, LLC DBA Full Moon Resort strongly suggests purchasing travel insurance.

REGISTER NOW!

Full Moon contact info:
Telephone: 845-254-8009
Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm (EST)

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Directions/Transportation

All Music Masters Camps are held in Big Indian, New York which is centrally located in the heart of the “Forever Wild” Catskill forest preserve.

Full Moon Resort
1 Valley View Road
Big Indian, NY 12410
Directions to Full Moon Resort

By Car:
Car parking is complimentary to all participants.

From Albany and points North:
Take the New York State Thruway (I-87) South towards New York City
Take Exit 19, Kingston (see below)

From New York City and Points South:
Take the New York State Thruway (I-87) North/West to Exit 19, Kingston
After toll, merge slightly right onto Route 28 West (towards Pine Hill)
Travel approximately 30 miles on Route 28 West to Big Indian/Oliverea
Turn left onto County Route 47 (just after a brown sign on Route 28 which says Oliverea 3 miles)
Proceed 5 miles on County Route 47 (Oliverea Road)
You will see signs for Full Moon on the right-hand side.

By Plane:
The closest airports to Big Indian are one hour and thirty minutes away:
Albany International Airport and Stewart/Newburgh International Airport

Albany International Airport (ALB):
737 Albany Shaker Rd
Albany, NY 12211
Phone: (518) 242.2222
http://www.albanyairport.com/

Stewart-Newburgh International Airport (SWF):
1180 1st Street
New Windsor, NY 12553
Phone: (845) 564-2100
http://www.panynj.gov/airports/stewart.html

JFK and LaGuardia Airports in New York City are approximately two and a half hours from Big Indian.

Airport Car Services:
Woodstock Town Car Service: (845) 679-6656
Black Diamond Transportation: (845) 338-8426

By Bus:
Adirondack Trailways buses run from NYC and Kingston, NY. There is a stop on Route 28 at the Big Indian post office just five miles from Full Moon Resort. Email us to arrange a pick up from the Big Indian bus stop to Full Moon Resort.

NYC buses depart from the Port Authority bus terminal in Manhattan at 9.30am, 12.30pm and 3.30pm (EST) daily and take approximately three hours to reach Big Indian. One way fare is approximately $35, return is approximately $70.
For additional schedule information and bus stop locations, visit www.trailwaysny.com or call 1-800-776-7548

Big Indian Bus Stop Located At the Big Indian Post Office:
8279 State Route 28
Big Indian, NY 12410
*Email music@fullmoonresort.com to let us know when you will be arriving and we will be sure to have a shuttle waiting to bring you to camp!

By Train:
The closest train station is in Rhinecliff, NY which is approximately one hour away from Big Indian.

Rhinecliff Amtrak Station (RHI)
Hutton St. and Charles St.,
Rhinecliff, NY 12574
Phone: 1 (800) 872-7245
Station and Service Hours: Open 7 Days a Week: 5:30am-10:30pm

**Carpooling is suggested!

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Creative Music Foundation in the News: U.K.’s Wire Magazine Features CMS

40 years ago, in bucolic settings around Woodstock, New York, the revolution against Western art and popular music conventions gained a tenacious if rather informally institutionalised foothold. The Creative Music Studio (CMS) was an outpost of radical musical ideas founded in 1973 by two German expatriates: Karl Berger, then a 38 year old vibraphonist, and his wife, singer Ingrid Sertso. They acted at the urging of that 20th century iconoclast Ornette Coleman, with encouragement from John Cage, Buckminster Fuller, Frederic Rzewski and George Russell, among other visionaries. Trumpeter Don Cherry was foremost among their active supporters.”

Read more from Howard Mandel’s article on CMS in Issue #351 of Wire Magazine: http://thewire.co.uk/archive/issues/351

Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso Receive ‘Jazz Heroes’ Award

The Jazz Journalists Association named CMF co-founders Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso as two of its 2013 ‘Jazz Heroes.’ Based on nominations from local communities and jazz journalists, Berger and Sertso were named for their ‘dedication to local efforts that nurture the spirit of jazz and ensure its transmission to new generations of jazz lovers.’

In announcing the award, Howard Mandel, JJA president, proclaimed:

‘“Jazz Hero” is almost too limiting a term to apply to Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso, the people who initiated the first Creative Music Studio workshops in Woodstock, New York 40 years ago. From the first, CMS presented all kinds of music: Indian bansuri flute virtuosity, Cagean conceptualism, the rhythmic practice Karl called “Gamala-TaKi,” even an hour in the afternoon devoted to silence and meditation (Ingrid’s idea). But jazz, in its terms of being open, innovative, adoptive and adaptable, spirited, unpredictable yet full of feeling, does seem to be at the core of the Creative Music Studio’s philosophy as it was at the base of its birth.

CMS was a music experience inspired by Ornette Coleman — who wouldn’t give a workshop there “because then people would think I knew something” — and Don Cherry, who Ornette called “the man with the elephant memory.” It was Cherry who had lured Karl and Ingrid from Europe (both of them born in Germany, both had begun musical careers there) to New York City, then became their Woodstock mainstay, attracting “guiding artists” and “participants” (not teachers and students) from all over the world sort of in the same way he drew melodies out of the sky with the short-wave radio and headphones he wore then, everyplace he went. Cherry may be considered the first prophet of “world music.” Karl Berger, with his doctoral degree and offhand brilliance improvising on vibes and piano, and his wife Ingrid, who sang as if influenced by Chet Baker and Marlene Dietrich, are the founders and bedrocks of CMS, an idea and a place aflame in the ‘70s, dimmed in the ‘80s, never completely gone and far from forgotten, now arising anew with a jazz-star studded intensive scheduled for May 20 to 24 at the Full Moon Resort, another Catskill hamlet not far from the original CMS site.

More explanation: the Creative Music Studio is an outgrowth of the Creative Music Foundation, a non-profit organization Berger and Sertso incorporated as instructed in 1971 by Carla Bley and Michael Mantler, on the order of their Jazz Composers Orchestra Association. Berger, who is heard making beautiful music with Gato Barbieri, Pharoah Sanders, J.F. Jenny-Clarke, Henry Grimes and Edward Blackwell on Don Cherry’s 1966 masterpiece Symphony for Improvisers, taught public school kids, adults at the New School, students in Frankfort (he is from Heidelberg, Ingrid from Munich) before arriving with Ingrid and their daughters in the town where the Woodstock festival wasn’t, but the try-anything musical ethos was.

They fostered a non-competitive, non-hierarchical climate, concentrating on musical fundamentals and processes rather than skills tied to specific vocabularies and styles. It turned into a community, which has been loose but self-sustaining. Early on they were joined by Dave Holland, Jack DeJohnette, Anthony Braxton, Frederic Rzewski, Nana Vasconcelos, the Art Ensemble of Chicago, Cecil Taylor, Abdullah Ibrahim and many others, who offered ideas and inspiration to a stellar generation of daring artists very active today. Many of the “participants” remained in the Woodstock area and several — pianist Marilyn Crispell, flutist Steve Gorn, trumpeter Steven Bernstein, bassist Mark Helias, will be guiding artists next month.

This isn’t as far from the topic of Berger and Sertso’s “heroism” as it might seem, because the two of them have been able to keep a flicker of creative idealism productive even when politics and attitudes turned against that. They have both sustained personal careers, and the faith in their art to give a Creative improvisers Orchestra a try in New York City, starting just under two years ago. Their “try” was an enormous success; in 18 months they led an orchestra of 18 to 25 players, drawn from a rotating cast twice that size, in 45 open rehearsals followed by concert sets in Manhattan’s the Stone, the Jazz Gallery, El Taller (where they resume performances April 4) and Brooklyn’s Shapeshifter Lab. This is an improvising orchestra — no sheet music is used, no set list imposed, the music flows organically, often with grandeur. Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso learned at least as much as they taught during the initial decade of the Creative Music Studio, and have expanded on the discoveries they made, nurturing many other musicians, presenters, educators and listeners in the process. If that ain’t heroism — but it is. Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso, Jazz Heroes and creators, still.’

Creative Music Studio’s 40th Anniversary Workshop Opens Evening Concerts to the Public

Each night during the CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop, MaY 20-23, a different group of musicians will perform from 8-11pm. The concerts will take place at the Full Moon Resort, Big Indian, NY, about 30 minutes west of Woodstock, in the Cafe, and will feature Guiding Artists such as Oliver Lake, Dave Douglas, John Medeski and many others. The concerts are open to the public. Information on the workshop, including driving directions to Full Moon, can be found at:

http://www.creativemusicfoundation.org/cms-40th-anniversary-workshop.html.

In addition to Creative Music Foundation co-founders Karl Berger (piano, vibes) and Ingrid Sertso (voice), the following workshop Guiding Artists are scheduled to play on the following days:

Monday May 20: Oliver Lake (sax), Mark Helias (bass) and Tani Tabbal (drums)

Tuesday May 21: John Medeski (keyboards), Mark Helias (bass), Marilyn Crispell (piano), Tani Tabbal (drums)

Wednesday May 22: Dave Douglas (trumpet), Steven Bernstein (trumpet), Marilyn Crispell (piano), Steve Gorn (flutes), Kenny Wessel (guitar), Harvey Sorgen (drums), Ken Filiano (bass), and Tom Buckner (voice)

Thursday (May 23): Don Byron (reeds), Steven Bernstein (trumpet), Steve Gorn (flutes), Kenny Wessel (guitar), Harvey Sorgen (drums), Ken Filiano (bass), and Tom Buckner (voice).

CMF will ask for a donation at the door. Please share this with others.

Creative Music Studio’s 40th Anniversary Workshop Recap: Four-day Intensive Features Workshops and Unique Concert

Engaging workshops and groundbreaking concerts in a breathtakingly beautiful natural environment.  And, the food was great!

The Creative Music Studio’s first 40th anniversary workshop took place between May 20 -24 at Full Moon Resort, nestled streamside in a valley 30 minutes west of Woodstock, NY.  Twenty five participants interacted day and night with 15 guiding artists, including Marilyn Crispell, Don Byron, Dave Douglas, John Medeski, Steve Gorn, Tom Buckner, Mark Helias, Steven Bernstein, Ken Filiano, Oliver Lake, Harvey Sorgen, Tani Tabbal, Kenny Wessel, and of course Creative Music Foundation co-founders Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso.

The following offers a short, daily recap:

Monday, May 20:

 The CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop at Full Moon Resort is underway.  Storm clouds cleared and we started with hot, humid weather, especially for the western Catskills in May. After refreshing drinks at the open bar and all kinds of tasty appetizers, Karl Berger gave a short orientation, welcoming the guiding artists and participants, sharing some CMS history, some anecdotes and then asking everyone to introduce themselves and why they came.  One person said that he came to ‘go beyond genres and to learn and feel and play pure music.’ Karl responded, “Perfect.” We went to the cafe for a wholesome, tasty and filling dinner and then walked up to the Roadhouse to hear a concert.  It started quietly, with Karl playing keyboards, Mark Helias on bowed bass, playing microtones. Tani Tabbal came in with mallets on tom toms and a Ingrid Sertso fit in beautifully, offering sounds that meshed with the musicians. Then Oliver Lake joined in and the energy really picked up. The group played for 90 or so minutes, fully improvised gems.  A lot of the focus was on our special guest, Oliver, who doesn’t come to this area too often. He mentioned how great it is to be in such natural beauty, in a place really suited for music. After the concert, various participants picked up their instruments and started long, democratic jams where people were listening as much as playing, learning about each other as players. What a great start to the workshop!

Tuesday, May 21:

 If there was a common thread through today’s remarkable slate of workshops it was: Find your voice, play your music. After morning body awareness lead by Savia Berger, followed by a gamalataki rhythm and voice workshop Karl and Ingrid conducted, guiding artist John Medeski led the group first through exercises to help develop musical conversation and transitions, and followed with an exercise based on Karlheinz Stockhausen. Oliver Lake lead an afternoon workshop first by playing a solo performance, and then instructing the group on orchestral pieces he had written. Mark Helias urged participants to take note of what’s unique in their playing, to write it down as their own ‘self-orchestral language.’  He also shared thoughts on when to be self-judgemental and when to let it go (hint: when you’re performing).  The workshops ended with a Tibetan bell ‘listen to the sounds disappearing’ meditation.

Tonight’s concert featured Karl on vibes, Ingrid vocals, Mark on bass, Tani Tabbal drums, Bob Selcoe guest trumpet. Later Sylvain Leroux sat in, as did participants from the workshop.

Special thanks to videographers Don Mount and Robert O’Haire, and Matthew Cullen, our sound engineer.

Wednesday, May 22:

 Today was very special. After morning body awareness and a really deep gamalataki rhythm and voice training session, Karl worked with the group on finding a group sound, on dynamics, on listening. “Every note contains every other note,” was his mantra, truly freeing the group to play with greater openness. He talked about getting out of the rational mind and into the creative mind, a sentiment echoed by special guest guiding artist Dave Douglas who gave an afternoon workshop. After sharing his deep gratitude for being a musician of sound mind and body, of being able to be together at Full Moon in nature surrounded by great musicians, and of having so much music passed down through the generations, Dave jumped in to his composition workshop, offering the group a variety of exercises to inspire composition. His bottom line: stay really focused and give yourself tight limitations to work within. The group liked this very much and then everyone played their compositions. Marilyn Crispell joined him, offering her own insights into composition.  Later in the afternoon, Kenny Wessel gave an insightful presentation and demonstration of Ornette Coleman’s theory of harmolodics while Tom Buckner taught a spirited improv class.

The fireworks at the evening concert were even greater than the lightening storm that lit the sky;  Dave Douglas, Steven Bernstein, Marilyn Crispell, Karl Berger, Harvey Sorgen, Kenny Wessel and John Menegon tore through a bunch of Ornette and Don Cherry tunes (also Coltrane’s “Cherryco”),  electrifying everyone in the roadhouse performance space. It was truly memorable and ‘historic,’ according to Bernstein. We agree.

Thursday,  May 23

 Today was like an anatomy lesson. Steven Bernstein lead the morning master class, explaining the ‘science, spirituality and language’ of music, and emphasizing the importance of daily practice rituals, or ‘the practice of practice.’  Don Byron taught the science of composing, editing and rewriting. On the spot compositions were critiqued and analyzed, themes were reworked and tunes reshaped – the anatomy of composition. One piece, written in minutes by CMS  alum Bob Selcoe, caught Dony’s ear and was later played in his evening concert.  Steve Gorn taught us the anatomy of a raga, and opened the evening concert playing flute ragas backed by Marilyn Crispell on tambura. Don Byron’s set followed with Karl on piano, Ken Filiano on bass and Harvey Sorgen on drums.  Don played tenor sax and clarinet and the group ended their set with a Tom Dorsey gospel tune, an unusual but apt ending to a CMS gig. Spirited sets of jamming followed, ranging from a euphonium, guitar (Ken Wessel), drum and bass quartet to groups including an iPad, tenor and alto saxes, bass clarinet, African flute, piano, guitar, trumpet, voice and more.

 The week was a heavenly experience that most of us will never forget. Thanks to Full Moon Resort for being gracious hosts who fed us well and made us feel at home. And, special heartfelt thanks to all the musicians who generously gave their selves and their wisdom to the participants. And, of course special thanks to Karl Berger, Ingrid Sertso and Rob Saffer of the Creative Music Foundation, for putting all of it together.

 

Quotes about CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop May 20-24, 2013

“It was a life changing experience, which opened windows on a variety of modalities of music improvisation. The jazz idiom was central, and most participants were fluent in it, but it was not the only idiom. World music (which could have been developed further) and contemporary classical music lurked around in everything we did.”

“Striking to me was the human, and almost spiritual aspect of the workshop, as incorporated in the music practice and the relationship between participants and some of the guiding artists. “

“I was challenged and inspired by the different approaches taken by the guiding artists, and I thought all were outstanding. I also enjoyed meeting the other participants and sharing in their ideas, experiences and perspectives.”

 “I will most remember the incredible music played by the guest artists. Great to hear time played with such virtuosity, feel, and originality. I can’t express it clearly, but there is something about this way of playing that gets to the heart of things rather than just recreating a style. No museum music here. There were moments when the hall lifted off the ground.”

“I’m revisiting the GAMALATAKI material with renewed vigour, even using it to improve my swim stroke. Try doing the elementary backstroke in 5/4. it works! I’ve learned that the approach to the down stroke – sweeping your arms up from your sides to above your head – is just as important as the down stroke itself, which is just what Karl emphasized in attending to all aspects of the pulse equally.”

“This was a very rewarding experience for me! I enjoyed being in nature and around people of like mindsets – no ego, no notions of what music is or isn’t. I was very excited and left so inspired, filled with encouragement.”

“The CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop was an experience that brought meaning behind the notes your playing , beyond the technique and into playing beauty.”

“I liked the way that workshops seemed to be geared to just about everyone in the room. So a professional might gain as much as an intermediate player. Getting to immerse myself in the thinking and practice of playing more freely gave lots of knew ideas that I am already using in my practice (and trying to incorporate into performance).”“The improvising orchestra was not only a highlight of the workshop, it was one of the most engaging musical experiences I have ever taken part in.”

“The entire workshop was a plus. So many engaging sessions, opportunities to talk with the guiding artists, hearing them play and hanging out over good food with participants and faculty all combined to make this a great experience. “

“I wanted to start to understand how musicians who play more freely (for lack of a better term) prepare to do what they do. I got that and more.”

“I have attended many jazz music camps, CMS was the most intimate and engaging. I learned things that I am sure I will continue to try to apply for a long time. “

 “I certainly picked up some practical pointers, especially attention to dynamics and the importance and utility of spending more time on composition.  I also really enjoyed having the opportunity to play with experienced, talented musicians dedicated to improvisation and seeing how I could contribute to and become part of a collective musical expression with them; it was rewarding (and, at least to some extent, validating), and I can already sense the effect that experience is having on my playing, both individually and with others.  There’s also the sense that I was able to touch (or at least get closer to) something both more abstract and more fundamental about music, both through the GaMaLaTaKi workshops and the duo and larger group playing opportunities; that’s something I’ve been recalling unexpectedly over the last week or so, which suggests to me that the workshop was more profoundly affecting than I probably realized while it was happening.  My personal takeaway is that I feel that I have a closer relationship with music and my role in it than I had before, which may not have been exactly what I was looking for when I signed up, but which I’m delighted to have.”

Creative Music Foundation Launches First Crowd-Sourcing Campaign — Raising Funds to Digitize its Archive of Rare Recordings

The nonprofit Creative Music Foundation has launched its first crowd-sourcing campaign on Kickstarter.com, aiming to raise $4,000 to help produce compilation CD box sets comprised of music from the CMS Archive Project, over 400 concerts that took place at the Creative Music Studio between 1973 and 1984.

Some of the artists in the CMS Archive include: Jimmy Giuffre, Ed Blackwell, Don Cherry, Oliver Lake, Olu Dara, Colin Walcott and Cecil Taylor, as well as CMF co-founders Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso, among hundreds of others. CMF needs funds to help finish restoration, digitization and production on the first volume of 3-CD box sets, the Creative Music Studio Archive Project Series, which is being packaged and distributed by the American Composers Forum/Innova Recordings.

The Kickstarter ‘crowd sourcing’ campaign:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1283522323/creative-music-studio-archive-restoration-project

will last 60 days, beginning June 28, 2013 and ending August 22, 2013. Donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent of the law.

The CMS Archive Project has three goals:
1) to restore, preserve and digitize the tapes for posterity;
2) to return the re-mastered versions to the musicians who made them; and
3) to share the music with fans, musicians and scholars around the world by producing a series of 3-CD box sets,
the Creative Music Studio Archive Project Series.

The tapes are old and brittle; some are no longer playable. It’s a race against time because over time, the tapes deteriorate. The sooner CMF can digitize and re-master them, then the risk of losing this historically and musically important archive will be minimized.

CMF is offering the following incentives to people who donate money on Kickstarter.com:

$25 Limited edition ‘surprise’ CD by a CMS guiding artist
$50 First edition of 3-CD box set
$100 Autographed first edition of 3-CD box set
$250 Donor’s name on the packaging as a member of the ‘producer’s circle’

The Creative Music Foundation has partnered with Columbia University’s Library to preserve the CMS Archive for posterity. CMF is giving Columbia the full archive of recorded tapes, along with memorabilia and photographs from the Creative Music Studio sessions. CMS co-founder Karl Berger and audio engineer (and former CMS participant) Ted Orr are going through each tape, digitizing and re-mastering them, a time consuming process that’s as much a labor of love as it is technical. The digitized, re-mastered recordings will be available at the Columbia University Library for scholars or others who want to enjoy and learn from them.

As part of its nonprofit mission, CMF is offering the Guiding Artists who made these rare recordings a digitized version for their unrestricted use. At the discretion of the Guiding Artists, selections of the re-mastered, digitized recordings will be made available in CD. These compilations will help raise money for the Creative Music Foundation and its music education programs.

CMF is partnering with American Composers Forum and its Innova recording label to release these compilation recordings. Each volume will feature three compact discs full of rare recordings divided into small ensemble, orchestral and world music performances.

Two volumes of 3 CDs each will be released annually, beginning in fall/winter 2013. The first edition of the box sets features the following artists:

SMALL ENSEMBLES: Ed Blackwell/Charles Brackeen; David Izenson, Karl Berger, Ingrid Sertso, James Emery/Leroy Jenkins, Ursula Oppens/Fred Rziewski

ORCHESTRAL: Oliver Lake; Olu Dara; Roscoe Mitchell

WORLD: Foday Musa Suso, Nana Vasconcelos, Ismet Siral

More information about the CMS Archive Project can be found at: www.creativemusicfoundation.org/archive-project.html.

The Creative Music Foundation, a 501C(3) nonprofit corporation, makes it possible to profoundly experience and express our deep connection with the transforming energies of music, our universal language. CMF programs focus on the common elements of all music, emphasizing keen awareness, personal expression, intensive listening and cross-cultural communication, and providing unique opportunities for musicians, students and listeners from different backgrounds and traditions to explore together, share, develop, and broaden their musical understanding and sensitivity. CMF pursues its mission through workshops, residencies, coaching, concerts, recordings and archival projects that engage both listeners and musicians in the USA and around the world.

Karl Berger’s Improvisers Orchestra on Friday, September 13 at El Taller

7:30PM Workshops/Rehearsal, 9:00PM Performance

Karl Berger’s Improvisers Orchestra starts its new season at El Taller, 2710 Broadway (corner of W 104 Street). The KBIO, founded in 2011, celebrates its 60th appearance in New York. El Taller provides an informal, generous, almost party-like experience.

Karl Berger’s Orchestra of 25+ professional string, horn, and percussion soloists continues to turn improvisational ideas developed in the 7:30 pm open workshop/rehearsal into a fully formed 9 pm performance. Karl introduces an exciting approach and experience of blending and harmonizing improvised sounds and rhythms in constantly shifting instrumentations.

Conducted in Karl’s inimitable style, developed at the legendary Creative Music Studio, this orchestra of extraordinary improvisers explores original compositions by Karl Berger as well as melodies from the world’s folk traditions, and themes written by visionaries such as Don Cherry or Ornette Coleman, as well as musical ideas that arise spontaneously in solo/duo/trio contributions by the players. One of the orchestra’s trademarks is Ingrid Sertso’s uncanny vocalizations and poetry.

Recent commentaries paint a vivid picture of the orchestra’s proceedings:

“Karl Berger has been a pioneer in large-scale jazz improvisation longer than just about anybody, which explains why his Improvisers Orchestra swings as hard, and interestingly, and often hauntingly as they do… elegant and economical pianist, which informs how he conducts..Like the best big bands, this crew use the entirety of their dynamic range. The ensemble weren’t often all playing at once, making those lush crescendos all the more towering and intense…….with the phantasmagorical sweep of the Gil Evans Orchestra and the rough- and-tumble bustle of the Mingus bands. The camaraderie and warmth of the repartee between the orchestra and conductor – and among the orchestra itself – was visceral”.

(lucidculture.wordpress.com)

 

“The suite-like performances have a warm, buoyant vibe issuing from brief folkloric-like motifs and the low-key, common-sense guidance Karl offers his players. They are mostly veteran musicians from avant rock and world music as well as jazz scenes, and can expand on simple themes paying utmost attention to dynamics and each other…..The collective’s intuited communication has attained a high point since shows began last April 2011.

(Howard Mandel, www.artsjournal.com/jazzbeyondjazz/)

 

“The compositions of Karl Berger have a clear-cut destination, with a beginning, a middle, and an ending…..Surprisingly, much of Mr. Berger’s music isn’t exactly free form but draws on lush harmonies and a well-defined relationship between foreground soloists and background…..The music is comparatively easy on the ears because Mr. Berger also relies on woodwinds, reeds and strings (as well as the soothing voice of Ingrid Sertso) rather than brass.”

(Will Friedwald, Wall Street Journal)

 

“I love the atmosphere that Karl and Ingrid create. For me it’s an oasis in the middle of all these stressful energies that the city brings.”

(Sonia Megias, composer)

 

 

The growing roster of alternating soloists with KBIO include Warren Smith, Joe Hertenstein, Lou Grassi, drums, John Pietaro, Hollis Headrick , percussions, Ken Filiano, Max Johnson, Adam Lane, James Liam Annett, bass, Tomas Ulrich, cello, Judith Insell, Chern Hwei Fung, viola, Jason Hwang, Frederica Krier, Sana Nagano, violin, Kirk Knuffke, Thomas Heberer, Brian Groder, Steven Bernstein, trumpet,Westbrook Johnson, trombone, Yasuno Katsuki, euphonium, Ken Ya Kawaguchi, shakuhachi, Sylvain Leroux, Yukari Watanabe, flutes, Ras Moshe, flute, tenor sax , Bill Ylitalo, piccolo flute, bariton sax, Blaise Siwula, Jason Candler, Miguel Malla, clarinets, Michael Lytle, Josh Sinton, bass clarinet, Ed Rollins, oboe, Sara Schoenbeck, bassoon, Catherine Sikora, Avram Fever, soproano sax, Welf Dorr, Patrick Brennan, Mercedes Figueras, alto sax, Peter Apfelbaum, James Brendon Lewis, Yoni Kretschmer,  tenor sax, Sean Sonderegger, baritone sax, Harvey Valdes, Kenny Wessel, guitar, John Ehlis, mandolin, Thomas Buckner, Ingrid Sertso, vocals, Karl Berger, keyboards.

The ensemble averages 30 players for each workshop and  performance.

The KBIO performances are benefits for the Creative Music Studio Archive Project. CMS celebrates its 40th Anniversary this season with new workshop and concert programming ( see: www.creativemusicfoundation.org ). Suggested Contribution is $15.

CMF Launches Indiegogo Campaign to Raise Funds to Digitize the CMS Archive

The Indiegogo ‘crowd sourcing’ campaign, http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/creative-music-studio-archive-restoration-project, will last 45 days, beginning September 17, 2013 and ending October 31, 2013.  Donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent of the law.  CMF’s first crowd sourcing campaign on Kickstarter exceeded its goal and raised over $5,000.

The CMS Archive Project has three goals: 1) to restore, preserve and digitize the tapes for posterity; 2) to return the re-mastered versions to the musicians who made them, free of charge; and 3) to share the music with fans, musicians and scholars around the world by producing a series of 3-CD box sets, the Creative Music Studio Archive Project Series.

“Some of the tapes are old and brittle; others are no longer playable,” said CMF co-founder Karl Berger.  “It’s a race against time because over time, the tapes deteriorate. The sooner we can digitize and re-master them, then the risk of losing this historically and musically important archive will be minimized. And, we’ll be able to share this incredible music with people all over the world.”

CMF is offering the following incentives to people who donate money to Indiegogo campaign:

$25      Limited edition ‘surprise’ CD by a CMS guiding artist

$50      First edition of 3-CD box set

$100    Autographed first edition of 3-CD box set

$250    Donor’s name on the packaging as a member of the ‘producer’s circle’

The Creative Music Foundation has partnered with Columbia University’s Library to preserve the CMS Archive for posterity. CMS is giving Columbia the full archive of recorded tapes, along with memorabilia and photographs from CMS. CMS co-founder Karl Berger and audio engineer (and former CMS participant) Ted Orr are going through each tape, digitizing and re-mastering them, a time consuming process that’s as much a labor of love as it is technical.  The digitized, re-mastered recordings will be available at the Columbia University Library for scholars or others who want to enjoy and learn from them.

As part of its nonprofit mission, CMF is offering Guiding Artists who made these rare recordings a digitized version for their unrestricted use free-of-charge.  At the discretion of the Guiding Artists, selections of the re-mastered, digitized recordings will be made available in CD compilations to help raise money for the Creative Music Foundation and its music education programs. CMF is partnering with American Composers Forum and its Innova recording label to release these compilation recordings. Each volume will feature three compact discs full of rare recordings divided into small ensemble, orchestral and world music performances. Two volumes will be released annually, beginning in winter 2013. The first edition of the box sets features the following artists:

Small ensembles: Ed Blackwell/Charles Brackeen; David Izenson, Karl Berger, Ingrid Sertso, James Emery/Leroy Jenkins, Ursula Oppens/Fred Rziewski

Orchestral: Oliver Lake; Olu Dara; Roscoe Mitchell

World: Foday Musa Suso, Nana Vasconcelos, Ismet Sirel

More information about the CMS Archive Project can be found at: www.creativemusicfoundation.org/archive-project.html.

Vijay Iyer and Cyro Baptista Join Growing List of Artists for CMS’s 40th Anniversary Fall Workshop

Composer/Pianist Vijay Iyer and Master Percussionist Cyro Baptista Join Growing List of Guiding Artists for CMS’s Fall Workshop

They Join Peter Apfelbaum, Tony Malaby, Jason Hwang, Kirk Knuffke, Tom Rainey, Kenny Wessel, Steve Gorn, Harvey Sorgen, Mark Helias, Thomas Buckner, Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso

October 7 – 11 Workshop Features Intensive Workshops, Jam Sessions and Concerts in a Spectacular Mountainside Setting

Deadline to Register is September 28 

REGISTER NOW!

Curriculum
Guiding Artist Biographies
About Full Moon Resort
FAQ
Pricing and Registration
Directions/Transportation

Composer/pianist Vijay Iyer and master percussionist Cyro Baptista are the latest Guiding Artists to join the Creative Music Studio’s 40th Anniversary workshop, October 7 – 11, at the well-appointed Full Moon Resort in Big Indian, NY. In addition to Vijay and Cyro, the four-day workshop will feature renowned musicians and educators, including Peter Apfelbaum, Tony Malaby, Jason Hwang, Kirk Knuffke, Thomas Buckner, Kenny Wessel, Steve Gorn, Mark Helias and others. They will join CMS Artistic Directors Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso, exploring CMS’s “Music Mind” practice that focuses on the common elements of all music, inspiring awareness, personal expression, intensive listening and cross-cultural communication. Registration deadline is September 28, 2013.

A highly successful four-day workshop in May at the Full Moon Resort, featuring Oliver Lake, Dave Douglas, John Medeski, Don Byron and many more re-ignited CMS and its nonprofit parent, the Creative Music Foundation.  Positive feedback from that workshop prompted CMS to offer another workshop during the height of autumn when the Catskill leaves are most colorful. Additional Guiding Artists and Special Guests will be announced soon.

This 40th Anniversary Workshop will feature four days of intensive workshops, master classes, concerts and informal jam sessions that inspire deep listening, personal expression, improvisation and musical exploration. Musicians of any instrument, including voice, are welcome as are non-musicians.  Adults who played music earlier in their lives can benefit from this lifelong learning opportunity that offers participants a once-in-a-lifetime experience to learn from and play with music masters, and to simply spend time with them in an informal, personal setting.

“In the CMS tradition, the May workshop offered not only profound teachings from music masters but also gave participants game-changing perspectives, said Karl Berger. “And the workshop inspired remarkable musical sharing and highlights. The Guiding Artists and Participants all asked us to do more workshops. This next workshop promises to be a magical experience for all of us. And needless to say: the food should be just as great, too”.

“The CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop was an experience that brought meaning behind the notes you play, beyond technique and into beauty,” said one May workshop participant. “This was a very rewarding experience.  I enjoyed being in nature and around people of like mindsets – no ego, no notions of what music is or isn’t. I was excited and left inspired, filled with encouragement.” A recap of the May workshop is at http://www.creativemusicfoundation.org/creative-music-studio’s-40th-anniversary-workshop-recap-four-day-intensive.html

A typical day at the CMS 40th Anniversary Workshop is:

8:00 – 9:30             Breakfast

9:30 – 10:00           Body Awareness

10:15 – 11:00         Rhythm/Voice Awareness, incl. the GaMaLa Taki practice

11:15 – 1:00           Orchestral Improvisation Workshop

1:00 – 2:15             Lunch

2:30 – 4:00             All Instruments Workshop with Guiding Artists

4:00 – 4:45             Instrument-specific classes and Free Time

4:45 – 6:00             All Instruments Workshop with Guiding Artists

6:00 – 6:30             Listening Meditation, Relaxation Time

6:30 – 8:00             Dinner

8:00 – 9:30             Concert with Guiding Artists

9:30 – ?                   Participant concerts and jams, unscheduled sessions

Late night consists of playing music, unscheduled sessions, conversations, bonfires, or simply stargazing at Full Moon’s gorgeous location in the heart of the Catskill Mountains. The non-traditional atmosphere of the Creative Music Studio Workshop encourages participants to experiment, push beyond limits, genres and categories, to take risks, and to develop their own deeply personal musical expression.

CMS’s parent nonprofit, the Creative Music Foundation, is working to offer full and partial scholarships for the workshop.

For more information and online registration, please call the Full Moon Resort, 845-254-8009, or by email: music@fullmoonresort.com. Registration deadline is September 7, 2013.

 

REGISTER NOW!

 

Full Moon contact info:
Telephone: 845-254-8009
Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm (EST)

 

 

Curriculum

Monday, October 7

  • Opening orientation in the Barn, hosted by Karl Berger, Ingrid Sertso and other special workshop leaders.
  • Introducing featured artists and any special guests
  • Brief review of daily workshops, activities, performances
  • Meet and Greet on Front Lawn with Open Bar and Hors D’Oeuvres
  • Dinner
  • Opening night performance in the “Roadhouse” performance space
  • Late night jams among participants  

Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday, October 8, 9, 10

  • Breakfast
  • Body awareness
  • Rhythm/voice awareness – Gamalataki practice
  • Late morning: Orchestral Improvisation Workshop
  • Lunch
  • Afternoon: All-instrument workshops/master class with Guiding Artists
  • Late afternoon: instrument-specific workshops, free time, individual lessons
  • Early evening listening practice/meditation
  • Dinner
  • Concerts with guiding artists
  • Jam sessions with guiding artists and participants

Friday, October 11

  • Breakfast
  • Group photo
  • Farewell and Departure

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Guiding Artist Biographies

 

Vijay Iyer – piano, composition 

Grammy-nominated composer-pianist Vijay Iyer (pronounced “VID-jay EYE-yer”) has been described by Pitchfork as “one of the most interesting and vital young pianists in jazz today,” by The New Yorker as one of “today’s most important pianists… extravagantly gifted… brilliantly eclectic,” and by the Los Angeles Weekly as “a boundless and deeply important young star.” His critical accolades continue in the form of awards and chart topping recognition, having received an unprecedented “quintuple crown” in the DownBeat International Critics Poll (winning Jazz Artist of the Year, Pianist of the Year, Jazz Album of the Year, Jazz Group of the Year, and Rising Star Composer categories); four top awards in the JazzTimes Critics Poll (Artist of the Year, Pianist of the Year, Composer of the Year and Best Acoustic/Mainstream Group of the Year for the Vijay Iyer Trio); as well as the Doris Duke Performing Artist Award and the Greenfield Prize; all in 2012 alone. He was named one of the “50 Most Influential Global Indians” by GQ India, and was voted Musician of the Year (2010) and Pianist of the Year (2012 & 2013) by the Jazz Journalists Association. He recently received a 2013 Echo Award (the “German Grammy”) for International Pianist of the Year.

Iyer has released sixteen albums as a leader; his most recent, Accelerando (2012) is the widely acclaimed follow-up to the multiple award-winning Historicity (2009), both featuring the Vijay Iyer Trio (Iyer, piano; Marcus Gilmore, drums; Stephan Crump, bass), recently described by PopMatters as “the best band in jazz.”  Iyer’s many collaborators include his generation’s fellow forward-thinkers Rudresh Mahanthappa, Rez Abbasi, Craig Taborn, Ambrose Akinmusire, Liberty Ellman, Steve Lehman and Tyshawn Sorey; elder creative music pioneers such as Steve Coleman, Roscoe Mitchell, Wadada Leo Smith, Butch Morris, George Lewis, and Amina Claudine Myers and scores of others from the worlds of classical music to hip hop.

A polymath whose career has spanned the sciences, the humanities and the arts, Iyer received an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in the cognitive science of music from the University of California, Berkeley. His papers have been published in a variety of publications. Iyer is on faculty at Manhattan School of Music, New York University, and the New School, and is the Director of The Banff Centre’s International Workshop in Jazz and Creative Music, an annual 3-week program in Alberta, Canada founded by Oscar Peterson.

Peter Apfelbaum – sax, drums, composition 

Peter Apfelbaum (born 1960) is an American avant-garde jazz pianist, tenor saxophonist, drummer and composer born in Berkeley, California. He first emerged on the jazz scene in the late 1970s, performing with Carla Bley from 1978–1982 and touring with Warren Smith and Karl Berger. Around this time Apfelbaum also studied and worked with musicians involved with the Creative Music Studio in Woodstock, New York. He graduated from Berkeley High School in 1978 in a class that included jazz pianist Benny Green.

Apfelbaum has made an impact on the avant-garde jazz and world music scene since the late 1970s and 1980s. He is a well known multi-instrumentalist and composer. His three main instruments are tenor saxophone, piano, and drums, but he has recorded and performed with a diverse array of percussion, wind, and other instruments. He has composed suites for various artists (including Don Cherry) as well as his 17-piece group The Hieroglyphics Ensemble. In 1990 Apfelbaum toured and recorded with Cherry in the group Multikulti, playing both piano and saxophone. In the early 1990s, Apfelbaum opened shows for The Grateful Dead with The Hieroglyphics Ensemble. Apfelbaum formed The Hieroglyphics Ensemble with jazz musicians from the San Francisco Bay Area, including Jeff Cressman, Will Bernard, Norbert Stachel, Jessica Jones, Tony Jones, Peck Almond, Dezon Claiborne, Josh Jones, Jai Uttal, and many others. In 1991 his album “Signs Of Life,” recorded with The Hieroglyphics Ensemble, went to No. 14 on Billboard (magazine)’s “top contemporary jazz albums.[1] The latest incarnation of this group, The New York Hieroglyphics, released “It Is Written” in 2005, featuring members from the original group and New York-based musicians such as Patrice Blanchard, Dafnis Prieto, Josh Roseman, and Abdoulaye Diabate as well as Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio, for whom Peter was music director. His compositions and performances have influenced many artists active in the contemporary jazz fusion scene. His work recombines and synthesizes varieties of world music (i.e. various non-Western diasporic musical traditions) with experimental jazz idioms.[2] Of how his music came into being, Apfelbaum writes: “My vocabulary reflects the fact that I started life as a drummer, was trained in jazz theory, blues and gospel music as a pre-teenager, became absorbed in African and Latin music as a teenager, listened to a lot of contemporary classical music, worked in R&B, reggae, blues, Latin, African, jazz, funk, Middle Eastern and Indian bands and, for as long as I can remember, I’ve been fascinated by how sounds can be fitted together.”

 

Cyro Baptista – percussion

Since arriving in the U.S. in 1980 to study at the Creative Music Studio in Woodstock, NY from his native country Brazil, Cyro Baptista has emerged as one of the premier percussionists in the country. Coinciding with the rise in the public’s interest of world music, Cyro has managed to record and tour with some of music’s most popular names. His mastery of Brazilian percussion and the many instruments he creates himself, have catapulted him into world renown.

With his own project, the percussion and dance ensemble known as ‘Beat the Donkey’ Cyro gives free reign to his imagination, mixing his tremendous musical skills, his natural humor and theatrical ways with instruments from Brazil, Middle East, Indonesia, Africa and US.

Cyro’s credits read like a “Who’s Who” of modern music. He toured extensively with Yo-Yo Ma’s Brazil Project, Trey Anastasio’s Band (of Phish), John Zorn’s Electric Masada, Herbie Hancock’s Grammy award winning “Gershwin’s World” , Sting and Paul Simon’s “Rhythm of the Saints”.

The wide range of artists Cyro Baptista has performed and recorded with include: David Byrne, Kathleen Battle, Gato Barbieri, Dr. John, Brian Eno, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Robert Palmer, Melissa Etheridge, Laurie Anderson, John Zorn, James Taylor, Carly Simon, Michael Tilson Thomas, Daniel Barenboin, Bobby McFerrin, Wynton Marsalis, Yo-Yo-Ma, Medeski Martin & Wood, Spyro Gyra, Trey Anastasio from Phish, Jay-Z, Snoop Dogg, Santana and Sting. He has also played with many respected Brazilian artists such as Milton Nascimento, Caetano Veloso, Ivan Lins, Marisa Monte, and Nana Vasconcelos.

 

Karl Berger – PhD, Founder Creative Music Foundation, composer, vibraphonist, pianist 

Founder and director of the nonprofit Creative Music Foundation, Inc., and creative leader of the legendary Creative Music Studio, Karl Berger is dedicated to the research of the power of music and sound and the elements common to all of the world’s music forms. In addition to his composing and playing, Karl is known around the world for educational presentations through workshops, concerts, recordings, and with a growing network of artists and CMS members worldwide.

Karl Berger is a six time winner of the Downbeat Critics Poll as a jazz soloist, recipient of numerous Composition Awards (commissions by the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, the Rockefeller Foundation, European Radio and Television: WDR, NDR, SWF, Radio France, Rai Italy. SWF-Prize 1994). Professor of Composition, Artist-in- Residence at universities, schools and festivals worldwide, PhD in Music Esthetics.

Karl Berger became noted for his innovative arrangements for recordings by Jeff Buckley (“Grace”), Natalie Merchant (“Ophelia”), Better Than Ezra, The Cardigans, Jonatha Brooke, Buckethead, Bootsie Collins, The Swans, Sly + Robbie, Angelique Kidjo and others; and for his collaborations with producers Bill Laswell, Alan Douglas (“Operazone”), Peter Collins, Andy Wallace, Craig Street, Alain Mallet, Malcolm Burn, Bob Marlett and many others in Woodstock, New York City, Los Angeles, Tokyo, London, Paris and Rome.

He recorded and performed with Don Cherry, Lee Konitz, John McLaughlin, Gunther Schuller, the Mingus Epitaph Orchestra, Dave Brubeck, Ingrid Sertso, Dave Holland, Ed Blackwell, Ray Anderson, Carlos Ward, Pharoah Sanders, Blood Ulmer, Hozan Yamamoto and many others at festivals and concerts in the US, Canada, Europe, Africa, India, Phillippines, Japan, Mexico and Brazil.

His recordings and arrangements appear on the Atlantic, Axiom, Black Saint, Blue Note, Capitol, CBS, Columbia Double Moon, Douglas Music, Elektra, EMI, Enja, Island, JVC, Knitting Factory, In&Out, MCA, Milestone, Polygram, Pye, RCA, SONY, Stockholm, Vogue and others.

 

Tom Buckner – Voice 

For more than 40 years, baritone Thomas Buckner has dedicated himself to the world of new and improvised music. Buckner has collaborated with a host of new music composers including Robert Ashley, Noah Creshevsky, Tom Hamilton, Earl Howard, Matthias Kaul, Leroy Jenkins, Bun Ching Lam, Annea Lockwood, Roscoe Mitchell, Phill Niblock, Wadada Leo Smith, Chinary Ung, Christian Wolff and many others. He has made appearances at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, the Herbst Theatre, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Ostrava Days Festival, the Prague Spring Festival, and the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki. Buckner is featured on over 40 recordings, including 6 of his own solo albums. His most recent solo recording “New Music for Baritone & Chamber Ensemble” includes works by Annea Lockwood, Tania Leon, and Petr Kotik. He also appears in the newly released CD/DVD “Kirili et le Nymphéas (Hommage à Monet)”. This recording documents the latest in his ongoing series of collaborations between the sculptor Alain Kirili and improvising musicians and dancers. For the past twenty years, Buckner has co-produced the Interpretations series in New York City. He also created the Mutable Music record label to produce new recordings and reissue some important historic recordings, previously unavailable in CD format.

 

Steve Gorn – Indian Flutes 

Steve Gorn, whose flute is featured on the 2011 Grammy winning recording, “Miho – Journey to the Mountain,” with the Paul Winter Consort, and the Academy Award winning Documentary film, Born into Brothels, has performed Indian Classical Music and new American Music on the bansuri bamboo flute, soprano saxophone and clarinet in concerts and festivals throughout the world. He is also featured on Angelique Kidjo’s Grammy nominated cd, “Oyo”

His unique blend of Indian music and contemporary world music can be heard on recordings with Paul Simon, Glen Velez, Jack DeJohnette, Paul Winter, Krishna Das, Jai Uttal, Tony Levin, Adam Rudolph, Layne Redmond, Richie Havens, Alessandra Belloni, Badal Roy, Simon Shaheen, Deepak Chopra, Robert Bly, Coleman Barks, and numerous Indian musicians. His numerous recordings include Luminous Ragas, the landmark Indian-Jazz fusion recording, Asian Journal, Pranam a jugalbandi with Barun Kumar Pal playing hansaveena, and Samir Chatterjee, tabla. His latest recording are Rasika, with tabla by Samir Chatterjee, and Illumination, with Nepali flutist, Manose.

 

Mark Helias  – Bassist, composer 

Mark Helias is a renowned bassist and composer who has performed throughout the world for more than three decades. After his studies at Rutgers University (B.A. 1974) and The Yale School of Music (M.M. 1976), he began his international career in the Anthony Braxton Quartet. Up to the present time he has performed with a panoply of world class artists including: Edward Blackwell, Anthony Davis, Dewey Redman, Marcel Khalife, Abbey Lincoln, Oliver Lake, Andrew Cyrille, Marilyn Crispell, Julius Hemphill, Don Byron, Bobby Bradford, Barry Altshul, Ray Anderson, Don Cherry, Cecil Taylor, and Gerry Hemingway.

A prolific composer, Helias has written music for two feature films as well as chamber pieces and works for large ensemble and big band. His orchestra piece “Stochasm” was premiered by the American Composers Orchestra in June of 2011. He has produced many recordings for other artists including Ray Anderson, Tony Malaby, Bobby Previte, Jerome Harris, and Mark Dresser.

Twelve albums of his music have been released since 1984, including “Split Image”, “The Current Set” (1987), “Desert Blue” (1989) “Attack The Future”, (1992) “Loopin’ the Cool” (1995), “Fictionary” (1998), “Come Ahead Back” (1998) “New School” (2001). “Verbs of Will” (2004), “Atomic Clock” (2006), “Strange Unison” (2008). His latest CD, “Explicit”, will be released September, 2011 on the French label Futura Marge.

His trio, Open Loose with Tony Malaby and Tom Rainey, has become an archetypal improvising ensemble on the New York scene. He continues performing and recording with BassDrumBone, a three decade long collaboration with Gerry Hemingway and Ray Anderson. Mr. Helias performs solo bass concerts and can also be heard in the innovative bass duo, “The Marks Brothers”, with fellow bassist Mark Dresser. He teaches at Sarah Lawrence College, The New School University and SIM (School for Improvisational Music).

 

Jason Hwang – violin, composer 

Jason Kao Hwang (composer, violin/viola) has created works ranging from jazz, “new” and world music. He recently released his octet CD, Burning Bridge (Innova), commissioned by Chamber Music America/New Jazz Works, featuring Chinese and Western instruments. In 2011, he released Symphony of Souls (Mulatta), performed by his string orchestra Spontaneous River, and Crossroads Unseen (Eunonymus), the third CD of his quartet EDGE.

In 2012, Downbeat Magazine critics’ poll voted Mr. Hwang as “Rising Star for Violin” and his quartet EDGE received the Chamber Music America Residency Partnership grant. In 2011, the critics’ poll of El Intruso voted him “#1 for Violin/Viola.”

Burning Bridge premiered at the Chicago World Music Festival, and was performed at the Vision Festival (NYC), Edgefest (Ann Arbour, MI), the Bop Shop (Rochester, NY) and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery (Washington, D.C.). Symphony of Souls was performed at Edgefest, the Vision Festival, Living Theater (NYC) and Brecht Forum (NYC). In 2011 EDGE toured Poland, with concerts in Posnan, Katowice, and Krakow.  They have also performed at the Vancouver International Jazz Festival, Discover Jazz Festival (VT), Edgefest, Vision Festival, An die Musik (Baltimore), Transparent Productions (Washington, D.C.), Brooklyn College (NY) and many other venues. Stories Before Within (Innova), the second release by his quartet EDGE, was included in the “Top Ten Recordings of 2008” by Coda Magazine.  All About Jazz selected their first CD, EDGE (Asian Improv), as one of the “Top Ten CDs of 2006.” In 2010, All About Jazz/New York selected Commitment, The Complete Recordings, 1981-1983 (NoBusiness), from a collective quartet that was Mr. Hwang’s first band, as one the “2010 Reissued Recordings of the Year.”  In 2007, Euonymus Records released Local Lingo, Mr. Hwang’s duets with Sang Won Park (kayagum, ajeng, voice). In 2005, New World Records released Mr. Hwang’s chamber opera The Floating Box, A Story in Chinatown, which was named one of the “Top Ten Opera Recordings of 2005” by Opera News. Mr. Hwang’s long-standing ensemble, The Far East Side Band (1990-2004), which featured taiko, kayagum, tuba and his violin, released two CDs, Urban Archaeology (1996, Victo) and Caverns (1994, New World). The Far East Side Band performed at the Beijing International Jazz Festival (China), Chicago Asian American Jazz Festival, Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art, Whitney Museum (NYC), Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery, Vision Festival, World Music Institute (NYC), Jazz Spektakel Wuppertal (Germany), duMaurier Ltd. International Jazz Festival (Vancouver, Canada), International Festival Musique Actuelle (Victoriaville, Canada), and many other stages. Mr. Hwang also recorded with his trio, Unfolding Stone (1990, Sound Aspects), which featured percussion, string bass and his violin. Mr. Hwang’s composition Flight of Whispers, commissioned and performed by Music for Homemade Instruments, can be heard on eXchange: China(1999, CRI), a compilation CD of Chinese American composers.

Mr. Hwang has received support from Chamber Music America, US Artists International, U.S Embassy in Poland, American Music Center, Meet the Composer/New Residencies, National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts, New Jersey State Council on the Arts, Rockefeller Foundation, New York Community Trust, Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust, Greenwall Foundation, and Puffin Foundation. As violinist, Mr. Hwang has worked with Anthony Braxton, Pauline Oliveros, Henry Threadgill, Butch Morris, Reggie Workman, Vladamir Tarasov, Tatsu Aoki, Frances Wong, William Parker, Sirone, Dr. Makanda Ken MacIntyre, and many others.

Jason Kao Hwang has been artist–in-residence at the University of Southern Connecticut, Music From China, Museum of Chinese in America, and Asia Society. Mr. Hwang has lectured at Westminster, Brooklyn, and Queens College. Mr. Hwang taught Asian American Music, a course he originated for the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University.

 

Kirk Knuffke – trumpet, cornet, composer 

Originally from Colorado, trumpeter/cornetist Kirk Knuffke has been based in New York City since 2005. Kirk has proven himself to be a versatile, energetic and tenacious artist.  A largely self-taught musician, Kirk has also studied improvisation with great jazz artists such as Ornette Coleman, Art Lande and Ron Miles. He leads several of his own groups, including the Kirk Knuffke Quartet and trio, which play at venues across New york City. As a leader or Co-leader Knuffke has 10 recordings for labels: Cleanfeed, SteepleChase, Not Two, Relative Pitch, and No Buisiness.

Kirk stays very busy as a member of the celebrated Matt Wilson Quartet, touring the US, performing and teaching.  Recent concerts with Mr. Wilson brought Kirk to play at the New Port Jazz Festival and Jazz at the Lincoln Center’s Rose Hall with guest saxophonist Marshall Allen. The Matt Wilson Quartet plus John Medeski recorded a new CD for release in early 2014 on Palmetto Records. For 6 years Kirk enjoyed a fruitful and educational collaboration with the late Butch Morris resulting in 4 recordings and several European tours. As a sideman Knuffke also plays in The Mark Helias Quartet, the Andrew D’angelo Big Band, Josh Roseman’s Extended Constellations, The Jeff Davis Band, Ideal Bread, Brian Drye’s Bizingas Kenny Wollesen’s Wollesonic and Bill Goodwin’s Orntette. Kirk has also made appearances in venues outside the traditional New York jazz scene, including work with pop artist Josh Ritter on Sony Records.
Since arriving in New York, Kirk’s prolific work has included recordings and gigs with groups featuring, among others, Roswell Rudd, William Parker, Uri Caine, Myra Melford, Karl Berger, Jeff Lederer, Jamie Saft, Bob Stewart, John Tchicia, Graham Haynes, Mark Helias, Allison Miller, Vijay Iyer, Chris Speed, Jim Black, Tim Berne, Daniel Carter, Steve Swell, John Zorn, Tony Malaby, Dave Douglas, Billy Hart, Michael Formanek, Trevor Dunn, Angelica Sanchez, Joe Bonner, Chris Lightcap, Ted Nash, Steven Bernstein, and Mary Halvorson. Internationally, he has played with ensembles at jazz festivals in Saalfeldan Austria, Willisau Switzerland, The North Sea Jazz festival in Holland, The Moers festival as well as festival dates in Italy and France.

“Big Wig” was Kirk’s debut recording as a leader. Released in May of 2008 on Clean Feed Records, it was greeted with strong international reviews including the New York Times. Building on this success, in 2009, Kirk received a Jerome Foundation Composers grant though Roulette in New York City; the commissioned works of which were performed by a  trio with Kenny Wollesen and Lisle Ellis. The recording of that concert, entitled “Chew Your Food”, is now available on No Busisness Records. His second Clean Feed CD entitled “Amnesia Brown” featured a trio with Kenny Wollesen and Doug Wieselman. After its release in February 2010, it received 4 stars in Downbeat Magazine, where it was reviewed by Peter Margasak stating, “Over the last couple years, New York trumpeter Kirk Knuffke has quietly emerged as one of the most exciting and flexible hornmen on the scene.”

In 2011, Kirk and pianist Jesse Stacken released “Orange was the Color”, a collection of music by Charles Mingus, on SteepleChase Records;  Matt Wilson, Mary Halvorson and Kirk Knuffke came together to form the new collaborative trio “Sifter”, which was featured in the NYC Winter Jazz Festival;  and Sifter recoded their debut CD, that is due for release in fall 2013 . During 2011, Kirk also recorded steadily for several new records including: The Kirk Knuffke/Ted Brown quartet for SteepleChase records; another recording with Jesse Stacken entitled “Like A Tree”, this time joined by Kenny Wollesen on drums; duets with drummer Mike Pride for NotTwo Records in Poland; Other new projects for  are the new Mark Helias Quartet with fellow sideman Tim Berne and Mark Ferber; and Merger, a collaboration with Saxophonist Andrew D’angelo, Kenny Wollesen and Ben Street.

Other new recordings planned for release: Kirk Knuffke Quartet (with Michael Formanek, Billy Hart and Russ Lossing) ESAU duets with Jamie Saft,  Jeff Lederers Swing n’ Dix (with Matt Wilson and Bob Stewart), “Denver General” (wih Jeff Davis and Jonathan Goldberger)

 

Tony Malaby – sax, composer 

Originally from Tucson, Arizona, Tony Malaby has been permanently based in New York since 1995 and has been a member of many notable jazz groups including Charlie Haden’s Liberation Orchestra, Paul Motian’s Electric Bebop Band, Mark Helias’ Open Loose, Fred Hersch’s quintet and Walt Whitman project, Michell Portal’s Birdwatcher, various projects with Daniel Humair and bands led by Mario Pavone, Tim Berne, Chris Lightcap, Kris Davis, Angelica Sanchez, Michael Attias and Marty Ehrlich.

His debut cd “Sabino”(Arabesque) made the NY Times and Philadelphia City Paper’s top ten jazz lists for 2000. He has a brand new release: “Tamarindo” with bassist William Parker and Nasheet Waits on drums. It is available on the Clean Feed label. His other releases include: “Adobe” available on Sunnyside in the US, featuring Drew Gress and Paul Motian; Apparitions” on the Songlines label featuring Tom Rainey, Mike Sarin, and Drew Gress; and “Alive in Brooklyn Vol. 1 and 2” featuring Angelica Sanchez and Tom Rainey.

Tony leads several projects of his own including: APPARITIONS featuring: Drew Gress, Tom Rainey and Mike Sarin. The Tony Malaby CELLO TRIO, featuring Chicago cellist Fred Lonberg-Holm and percussionist John Hollenbeck. The quartet PALOMA RECIO(Loud Dove) with Ben Monder, Eivind Opsvik and Nashhet Waits. The trio TAMARINDO featuring bassist William Parker and Nasheet Waits on drums. Tony co-leads the Malaby Sanchez Rainey Trio.

 

Tom Rainey – drums and percussion 

Tom Rainey was born in Pasadena, California in 1957. Since moving to New York in 1979 he has performed and or recorded with the following artists: 

John Abercrombie, Mose Allison, Julian Arguelles, Ray Anderson, Tim Berne, Jane Ira Bloom, Anthony Braxton,  Nels Cline, Ted Curson, Mark Ducret, Mark Feldman, Michael Formanek, Drew Gress, Mark Helias, Fred Hersch, Andy Laster, Ingrid Laubrock, David Liebman, Joe Lovano, Tony Malaby, Albert Mangelsdorff, Carmen McRae, Mike Nock, Simon Nabatov, New and Used, Anita O’Day, Andrea Parkins, Herb Robertson, Angelica Sanchez, Louis Sclavis, Brad Shepik, Tom Varner, Ken Werner, and Denny Zeitlin. 

Current activities include performing and recording music with Ingrid Laubrock and Mary Halvorson as well as playing with many of the aforementioned artists.

 

Ingrid Sertso  – voice, poet, co-founder, Creative Music Foundation 

Through her work with such avant-jazz musicians as Don Cherry and Karl Berger, Ingrid Sertso established herself as a captivating, adventurous vocalist, capable of blending jazz, African, South American and other worldbeat influences into a distinctive, hypnotic sound.

Although Sertso didn’t become well-known until the release of Dance with It in 1994, she spent over 20 years honing her art. During the late ’60s, she lived in Europe, leading her own trios and performing with the likes of Eric Dolphy, Don Cherry, Steve Lacy, Karl Berger and Leo Wright; she also worked as a music teacher at several institutions in Europe. In 1972, she became a permanent resident of the United States and she released her first album, We Are You, on Calig Records. Over the next few years she taught, while she performed in North America and Europe with the likes of Cherry, Ed Blackwell, Lee Konitz, Sam Rivers, Jimmy Giuffre, Bob Moses, Dave Holland, Perry Robinson and Jumma Santos. In 1974, she released Kalaparush on Trio Records in Japan. It was followed in 1975 by Peace Church Concerts on India Navigation/CMC Records.

In 1975, Sertso became a faculty member at the Naropa Institute in Boulder, Colorado. She stayed there through 1975 and 1976, before moving to the Banff Centre of Fine Arts in Calgary, Canada. She had two residencies at Banff before moving to the Creative Music Studio in Woodstock, New York, where she became the co-director. While working at the Creative Music Studio, she began singing in the Art of Improvisation with Berger and David Inzenon. In 1979, she toured major European cities as a solo artists, supported by the Woodstock Workshop Orchestra. She also released an album on MPS Records that year.

During the early ’80s, Sertso remained a co-director at the Creative Music Studio, while continuing to record and perform with a variety of musicians, including such mainstays as Don Cherry and Karl Berger, as well as Paulo Moura, Nana Vasconcelos, Steve Gorn, Dan Brubeck and Mike Richmond. In 1984, she performed with the Music Universe Orchestra at the Kool Festival in New York and released a duet album, Changing the Time, with Berger on Horo Records in Italy. She also toured Europe twice during this time and she also toured West Africa with Olatunji and Aiyb Dieng.

Sertso’s career picked up momentum during the latter half of the ’90s. She held a series of concerts and workshops in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and she regularly tour the US on club and festival circuit. Sertso also toured Europe twice and sang solo vocals on Berger’s orchestral ballet, The Bird. She was one of the co-leaders of Rhythm Changes, who released the Jazzdance album on ITM Records. During these five years, she also performed and recorded with a variety of artists, including Pauline Oliveros, Lee Konitz, Frank Luther, Anthony Cox, Leroy Jenkins, Jimmy Cobber, Linda Montano and Karl Berger.

In 1990, Sertso catapulted back into the mainstream jazz spotlight through her version “Until the Rain Comes” on Don Cherry’s Multi Kulti album. Shortly afterward, she began working on a new album, but she became sidetracked by collaborating with Karl Berger and guitarist Paul Koji Shigihara. The trio blended original compositions with Sertso’s poetry, improvisations and interpretations of traditional tune. Sertso also regularly performed poetry readings at the Tinker Street Cafe in Woodstock and the Knitting Factory in New York, and she also regularly played clubs along the Northeast coast. In 1994, she released her comeback album Dance with It, which earned postitive reviews. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine (All Music Guide)

 

Harvey Sorgen – drums, percussion 

Harvey Sorgen’s vast and diverse career as a drummer/percussionist has given him a unique ability to fit in and play with artists of virtually every type of music. His orchestral concept on and off the instrument has distinguished Harvey as one of the truly unique drummers of our time. Expanding the boundaries of sound and color on the drum set, Harvey has had the opportunity to perform and record with a vast array of musicians, including: Hot Tuna, Ahmad Jamal, Michelle Shocked, Karl Berger, Paul Simon, Dewey Redman, Dave Douglas, David Sancious, Mark Feldman, Zakir Hussain, Giovanni Hidalgo, Leo Smith, Cameron Brown, Steve Swell, Anthony Braxton, Bruce Hornsby, Derek Trucks, Bill Frisell, Bob Weir, NRBQ, Phil Lesh, Greg Allman, Tony Levin, Jack DeJohnette, Garth Hudson and Jimmy Vivino, among many others.

Harvey has also written and performed pieces for film and the stage, including a solo percussion piece for the New Day Repertoire Theater’s version of “Antigone” and has conducted workshops throughout the world, from the University of Graz (Austria) and Jazz Initiative Marburg (Germany) to the University of Michigan and Virginia Commonwealth University. He is also an accomplished audio engineer and editor, having worked at the legendary Dreamland Recording Studio. Past projects include re-mastering of the entire ESP record label. Harvey’s first instructional video ” Drumming Made Easy ” is currently available worldwide from Homespun Tapes Inc. / Hal Leonard publishing. Harvey Sorgen also appears on Jack DeJohnette’s ” Musical Expression On The Drum Set” and Jorma Kaukonen’s ” The Electric Guitar Of Jorma Kaukonen “ DVD’s also available from Homespun Tapes Inc.

 

Omar Tamez – guitarist/composer/multi-instrumentist 

Omar studied composition with Nicandro Tamez, (composer and educator) as well as with with Andre Richard, Daniel Catan, Mario Lavista, Manuel de Elias, Helmut Lachmann, Pierre Boulez and Karlheinz Stockhausen. A visiting artist at CalArts, Omar is also the founder, producer and artistic director of the “International Musicians Meeting.” Mr. Tamez attended the NIMES (New Interfaces for Musical Expression) and Résonances Music Technology Convention at the IRCAM – Centre Pompidou, Paris, France. He teaches privately and at workshops around the world.

Mr. Tamez has performed in more than 137 countries including Mexico, United States, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Sweden, Denmark, Holland, Turkey, Canada, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Japan and extensively trough Middle East, Asia & Africa. He has played/recorded with Ramón López, Agustí Fernández, Gebhard Ullmann, Karl Berger, Conny Bauer, Gunter Sömmer, Felix Petry, Gabriele Hasler, Carl Ludwig Hübsch, Almut Kuhne, Frank Köllges, Andreas Willers, Reggie Workman, Rashied Ali, Sonny Fortune, Andrew Cyrille, Sam Rivers, Geroge Schuller, Ratzo B. Harris, Steve Baczkowski, Alex Coke, Joe Fonda, Harvey Sorgen, Herb Robertson, Steve Rust, Steve Swell, Lou Grassi, Tina Marsh, André Jaume, Beñat Achiary, Sophia Domancich, Rémi Charmasson, Teppo Ahuta – ahoo, Harri Sjöstrom, Kalle Kalima, Mikko-Ville Luolajan-Mikkola, Tony Oxley, Derek Bailey, Marco Colonna, Enrico Rava, Neil Swainson, Emilio Tamez, Rémi Álvarez, Hernán Ríos, Gustavo Lorenzatti, Satoshi Takeishi, Tatsuya Nakatani and Arjen Gorter among many others.

He recently participated in Wadada Leo Smith’s Golden Quartet/Double Quartet in Buffalo, NY, with Angelica Sánchez, John Lindberg and Pheeroan AkLaff .

 

Kenny Wessel – guitar, composition 

Ken Wessel is a versatile, sensitive and soulful guitarist and composer. A vital and personal voice on the jazz guitar, Wessel has been involved in projects playing jazz, ranging from straight-ahead to free music. Ken is also very interested in creating and investigating points of intersection between jazz and Indian music and has performed and recorded with musicians from various parts of the globe. He has performed in 26 countries at major jazz festivals, concert halls and in radio and television appearances.

Wessel worked with revolutionary jazz artist Ornette Coleman for over 12 years (1988-2000), touring the world as a member of Prime Time, Ornette’s groundbreaking ensemble. Ken can be heard on Ornette Coleman’s critically acclaimed Polygram/Verve CD, Tone Dialing. Performing “Skies of America,” Ornette Coleman’s seminal work for symphony orchestra and jazz ensemble, Ken has appeared with Kurt Masur and the New York Philharmonic and London’s Philharmonia Orchestra.
 He has worked with artists from different shades of the jazz spectrum, including John Abercrombie, David Liebman, Gloria Lynne, Arthur and Red Prysock, Karl Berger, Steve Gorn, Adam Rudolph, Hamid Drake, Donald Fagen, Steve Turre and Johnny Hartmann.

Ken has a strong interest in world music, particulary with North Indian music, and he has performed with Debashish Bhattacharya, Karaikudi Mani, V.M. Bhatt, Samir Chatterjee and others. Wessel co-leads a trio with jazz tabla master Badal Roy and bassist Stomu Takeishi. Their CD, Daybreak, was included in JAZZIZ magazine’s Top 10 Critic’s Picks of 1998. They have performed together extensively throughout North America. In 1995, Ken and Badal toured India and the U.S. with their composition, “Testimony,” which was commissioned by the Battery Dance Company. As a U.S. Jazz Ambassador, Ken has toured South Asia and South America, visiting India, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Bengladesh and Venezuela in 2002-03.
 He is an active composer (he has received numerous “Meet the Composer” grants) and his original music has an organic and evocative quality. Ken’s quartet with Joel Frahm (sax), Brad Jones (bass) and Kenny Wolleson (drums) has a CD in the works which will be released soon. His recent trio recording, Jawboning (CIMP), with bassist, Ken Filiano and drummer, Lou Grassi investigates the boundaries between freedom and structure. A dedicated jazz educator, Ken is currently on the faculties of the Music Conservatory of Westchester and Rutgers University. He has given clinics and Master classes at numerous institutions in the U.S. and overseas, including Yale University, Manhattan School of Music, Mahaidol University in Thailand, Music Academy in Oslo, and Columbia University.

 

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About Full Moon Resort

Full Moon, located one half hour west of Woodstock, New York, “the most famous small town in the world,” is a year-round mountain resort located in the heart of the “Forever Wild” Catskill Forest Preserve.  Dedicated to the celebration of nature, music and the arts, this one hundred-acre wonderland of mountains, fields, and streams is a world of its own.

Full Moon is an alternative to more traditional country inns and resorts – with educational, recreational and artistic workshops, weekend-long destination country weddings, cutting-edge music camps, and art exhibits all part of its magical landscape.

“Music and art in nature” is a central theme at Full Moon Resort. Music is always in the air with the Music Masters Camp series, a special mid-week interactive musical experience with world renowned artists – complete with superb dining, comfortable country inn accommodations, and camping options.

Lovingly prepared, fresh, healthy cuisine served by a friendly, professional staff is the trademark of Full Moon Catering.  The menus offer a full range of possibilities – hot buffet breakfasts and lunches, down-home country barbeques …tantalizing hors d’oeuvres and formal gourmet dinners in the Tent Pavilion.  Fresh, natural ingredients (often organic) are the common thread throughout.

Accommodations are charming in their simplicity, with guest rooms available in a variety of lodges  – some in a simple B&B style with shared hallway baths and others with private bath options.

In all, Full Moon Resort, with its picturesque grounds, cozy guest accommodations, excellent cuisine and friendly, professional staff, sets the stage for highly memorable experiences for those attending the Music Masters Camps.

Full Moon contact info:
Telephone: 845-254-8009
Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm (EST)

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FAQ

When will my deposit be run?
Your deposit will be run at the time of your registration.

What gear do I need?
Bring your instrument(s) if they fit! Amps are not required. For more information, email music@fullmoonresort.com to see what will be provided.

Can I still come if I’m not a musician? 
Non-musicians are more than welcome and encouraged to attend.

What skill level is required to attend?
Classes and curriculum are developed to accommodate all ranges of playing. All classes are optional and open to everyone.

Is there an age requirement?
No. Minors are required to submit a parent/legal guardian consent form.

Are meals included?
Three gourmet meals a day and snacks are included in your tuition.

If I want to bring my spouse, but they don’t want to attend classes, can I?
Yes. In order to bring a non-participant, you would need to purchase a “single occupancy” package. Non-participants have access to all meals, but no classes or workshops. Additional fees apply.

When is check in and check out?
Check in is at 3pm on arrival day and check out is at 11am on departure day. Due to Full Moon’s busy event calendar, it is generally not possible to check in early or check out late.

How do I get there?
Please see the ‘Directions/Transportation’ section below.

Is there cell phone reception at camp?
There is no cell phone reception at Full Moon Resort.  Complimentary phone service for all calls within the U.S. is available at all times at the Inn. Also, there is complimentary Wi-Fi available throughout the facility.

How do I make my final payment?
Your final payment will be automatically run on the credit card on file on the due date noted in your registration form. You may provide an alternative method of payment as long as it is received before the due date.

Can I take photos, video or audio recordings? 
Yes. You may be required to sign a waiver stating all recordings, footage and/or photos will be used strictly for personal use and not commercially.

What is the weather like at camp?
Weather in the Catskills varies. In the spring, you can expect warm days (low 60s to upper 70s) and cooler nights (lower 40s to lower 60s).  Click here for updated weather information.

What do you suggest I bring with me?
Audio recording devices
Camera
Clothes & Toiletries (toothbrush, soap, shampoo etc…)
Tent Campers- don’t forget towels, sleeping bags, tarps, etc.!
Insect Repellent
Swimwear
Flashlight
Writing Utensils & Note Paper
Water bottle
Cash for evening bars (There is no ATM on-site.)

Do you provide equipment storage for tent campers?
This can be arranged on an as needed basis.

Can I select my own roommate?
Yes – if that person is signed up as well. We cannot hold a spot for someone unless they have already registered.

How does the facility select my roommate?
Full Moon Resort selects roommates based on age and gender. You will always be placed with a same-sex roommate.

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Pricing and Registration

Camp Packages are All-Inclusive!

Monday to Friday you will have access to all workshops, seminars, gourmet meals, performances, and camp activities. The only thing you have to do after signing up is get here!

All camp activities will be held at Full Moon Resort. Full Moon features an eclectic array of comfortable, rustic country-inn accommodations including simple B&B style guest rooms with shared hallway baths and guest rooms with private baths. “Primitive” campsites are also available. All accommodations are just steps away from daily music camp activities. The grounds offer one hundred acres of meadows, forests and streams providing a natural backdrop for an unforgettable, enriching experience.

Guest rooms at Full Moon do not have telephones, TV’s, air conditioning or daily housekeeping service. Wi-Fi, cable television and complimentary phone service are all available at the Inn (please bring a phone card for international calls).   Enjoy the spring-fed swimming pool, on-site access to the Esopus Creek, and explore the splendors of the Catskills on the nearby network of hiking trails.

Please Note: There is no cell phone reception at Full Moon Resort or in Big Indian.

Package Pricing
  Note: Prices do not include applicable taxes

Full Moon Resort Accommodations:

Note: Prices include Full Moon Resort lodging, food and CMS workshops. Prices do not include applicable taxes.

Rates:

  • $695 Tent Camping
  • $895 Double Occupancy, Shared Bath
  • $995 Double Occupancy, Private Bath
  • $1,295 Single Occupancy, Shared Bath
  • $1,595 Single Occupancy, Private Bath
  • $495 Non-participant rates for spouse/children

 

Registration, Payment and Cancellation Terms and Conditions:

Your decision to register for Full Moon Resort Music Masters Camps constitutes your acknowledgement of and consent to all of the registration, payment and cancellation terms and conditions listed below.

Registration and Payments:

  • All rates are per-person
  • All rates are subject to a 2% county tax, 8% New York State Tax and a 1.5% online registration fee
  • Upon registration, a non-refundable deposit of $300 is charged to your credit card
  • 100% of the remaining balance due is automatically charged to the credit card on file on September 28, 2013
  • Any registrations received after September 28, 2013, must be paid in full at the time of registration 

Cancellation:

  • All payments and deposits are non-refundable, except when approved by the Creative Music Foundation.
  • Cancellations received before September 20, 2013 will not be charged the remaining balance
  • Cancellations received after September 20, 2013 will be charged the full remaining balance

Due to the nature of our events and strict cancellation policies, Creative Environments, LLC DBA Full Moon Resort strongly suggests purchasing travel insurance.

REGISTER NOW!

 

Full Moon contact info:
Telephone: 845-254-8009
Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm (EST)

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Directions/Transportation

All Music Masters Camps are held in Big Indian, New York which is centrally located in the heart of the “Forever Wild” Catskill forest preserve.

Full Moon Resort
1 Valley View Road
Big Indian, NY 12410
Directions to Full Moon Resort

By Car:
Car parking is complimentary to all participants.

From Albany and points North:
Take the New York State Thruway (I-87) South towards New York City
Take Exit 19, Kingston (see below)

From New York City and Points South:
Take the New York State Thruway (I-87) North/West to Exit 19, Kingston
After toll, merge slightly right onto Route 28 West (towards Pine Hill)
Travel approximately 30 miles on Route 28 West to Big Indian/Oliverea
Turn left onto County Route 47 (just after a brown sign on Route 28 which says Oliverea 3 miles)
Proceed 5 miles on County Route 47 (Oliverea Road)
You will see signs for Full Moon on the right-hand side.

By Plane:
The closest airports to Big Indian are one hour and thirty minutes away:
Albany International Airport and Stewart/Newburgh International Airport

Albany International Airport (ALB):
737 Albany Shaker Rd
Albany, NY 12211
Phone: (518) 242.2222
http://www.albanyairport.com/

Stewart-Newburgh International Airport (SWF):
1180 1st Street
New Windsor, NY 12553
Phone: (845) 564-2100
http://www.panynj.gov/airports/stewart.html

JFK and LaGuardia Airports in New York City are approximately two and a half hours from Big Indian.

Airport Car Services:
Woodstock Town Car Service: (845) 679-6656
Black Diamond Transportation: (845) 338-8426

By Bus:
Adirondack Trailways buses run from NYC and Kingston, NY. There is a stop on Route 28 at the Big Indian post office just five miles from Full Moon Resort. Email us to arrange a pick up from the Big Indian bus stop to Full Moon Resort.

NYC buses depart from the Port Authority bus terminal in Manhattan at 9.30am, 12.30pm and 3.30pm (EST) daily and take approximately three hours to reach Big Indian. One way fare is approximately $35, return is approximately $70.
For additional schedule information and bus stop locations, visit www.trailwaysny.com or call 1-800-776-7548

Big Indian Bus Stop Located At the Big Indian Post Office:
8279 State Route 28
Big Indian, NY 12410
*Email music@fullmoonresort.com to let us know when you will be arriving and we will be sure to have a shuttle waiting to bring you to camp!

By Train:
The closest train station is in Rhinecliff, NY which is approximately one hour away from Big Indian.

Rhinecliff Amtrak Station (RHI)
Hutton St. and Charles St.,
Rhinecliff, NY 12574
Phone: 1 (800) 872-7245
Station and Service Hours: Open 7 Days a Week: 5:30am-10:30pm

**Carpooling is suggested!

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