Fall Workshop, October 2 – 6, 2017

Guitarist, composer and bandleader Mary Halvorson, Creative Music Studio (CMS) associate artistic director and percussionist Billy Martin, and Turkish multi-instrumentalist Omar Tekbilek join CMS co-founders Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso as Guiding Artists for the CMS Fall 2016 Workshop intensive, October 2 – 6, at the ear-inspiring Full Moon Resort in Big Indian, NY.

Register Now

CMS’ Fall Workshop, in the height of the blazing autumn colors, features one Guiding Artist(s) working with participants in two workshops each day, creating multiple opportunities for artists to work directly with participants as individuals or in ensembles. As in the past, there will be daily CMS basic practice (body movement, breath work, rhythm and vocal training), as well as 90 minutes each day with Karl Berger leading orchestra of improvisers.   Bassist Ken Filiano, saxophonist Maria Grand, and additional Guiding Artists will be on hand to work with participants on a more personal level, informally coaching, playing and tutoring daily. 

Recent testimonials from workshop participants: “My playing was reborn; I’ve been given the key to a musical language shared by few; CMS is beyond musical, it’s therapeutic; The best musical experience I have had; It’s a dream workshop; CMS is an unsurpassed life-changing experience; CMS workshops are like a reset switch for your creativity and spirituality; I found my freedom at CMS, in my ability to play what I hear and to hear what I play; CMS is more than a lesson in music, it is a lesson for life."

CMS Workshop Guiding Artists in 2013 - 2017 have included Vijay Iyer, Steve Coleman, Dave Douglas, John Medeski, Henry Threadgill, Pauline Oliveros, Fabaian Almazan, Nels Cline, Susie Ibarra, Joe Lovano, Marty Ehrlich, John Hollenbeck, Rudresh Mahanthappa, Hassan Hakmoun, Adam Rudolph, Billy Martin, Oliver Lake, Don Byron, Tyshawn Sorey, Peter Apfelbaum, Tony Malaby, Cyro Baptista, Marilyn Crispell, Min Xiao Fen, Joe McPhee, Taylor Ho Bynum, Angelica Sanchez, Steven Bernstein, Jason Hwang, Kirk Knuffke, Kenny Wessel, Steve Gorn, Mark Helias, Tom Rainey, Maria Grand, Tanya Kalmanovitch, Thomas Buckner, Judi Silvano, Iva Bittova, Harvey Sorgen, Tani Tabbal, Ken Filiano, Badal Roy, Warren Smith, Omar Tamez, and John Menegon, in addition to Creative Music Foundation co-founders Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso.

A typical day at the CMS Workshop is:
8:00 – 9:30 Breakfast
9:45 - 10:05 Body Awareness
10:15 - 11:15 Basic Practice (rhythm/vocal)
11:30 – 1:00 Master Class/Workshop
1:00 - 2:00 Lunch
2:10 - 2:25 Body Awareness
2:30 – 5:00 Master Class/Workshop
5:10 - 6:30 Improvisers Orchestra
6:30 Listening Meditation
7:00 – 8:15 Dinner
8:30 – ? Performances/Jams

Late night consists of playing music in the Roadhouse and the Barn, unscheduled sessions, conversations, bonfires, or simply stargazing from Full Moon’s gorgeous location in the heart of the Catskill Mountains, with the historic Esopus Creek running through the expansive property.

CMS’s nonprofit parent, the Creative Music Foundation, is fundraising in order to offer scholarships for the workshop. For more information and online registration, please call the Full Moon Resort, 845-254-8009, email: music@fullmoonresort.com Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm (EST), or click this link to register:

Register Now

Daily Schedule (subject to improvisation)

Monday, October 2
4:30 – 6:30 Orientation/cocktails

Opening orientation in the main building, hosted by Karl Berger, Ingrid Sertso and other Guiding Artists
Introducing featured artists and any special guests
Brief review of daily workshops, activities, performances
Meet and Greet with Open Bar and Hors D’Oeuvres

6:30 – 8:00 Dinner
8:15 – 10 Performance
10 - ? Jams

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, October 3 - 5
8:00 – 9:30 Breakfast
9:45 - 10:05 Body Awareness
10:15 - 11:15 Basic Practice (rhythm/vocal)
11:30 – 1:00 Master Class/Workshop
1:00 - 2:00 Lunch
2:10 - 2:25 Body Awareness
2:30 – 5:00 Master Class/Workshop
5:10 - 6:30 Improvisers Orchestra
6:30 Listening Meditation
7:00 – 8:15 Dinner
8:30 – ? Performances/Jams

Friday, October 6
Breakfast
Farewell and Departure

Register Now

 

“I like that it wasn’t just about becoming a better musician, but also about becoming a better human being and an artist.The whole thing felt more intimate than any other program.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:29:08+00:00
“I like that it wasn’t just about becoming a better musician, but also about becoming a better human being and an artist.The whole thing felt more intimate than any other program.”

“I am still digesting what happened on the marvelous week and I probably will spend my whole life understanding more and more."
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:30:22+00:00
“I am still digesting what happened on the marvelous week and I probably will spend my whole life understanding more and more."

an inspirational delight

...general philosophy and ‘packaging’ of musical concepts is an inspirational delight...his words helped me reconnect with and respect the natural musical tendencies we all have! He is a gifted teacher...
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:31:09+00:00
...general philosophy and ‘packaging’ of musical concepts is an inspirational delight...his words helped me reconnect with and respect the natural musical tendencies we all have! He is a gifted teacher...

The Full Moon Resort was in a beautiful location in the mountains

“The Full Moon Resort was in a beautiful location in the mountains and the food was of high quality with many options. There was no shortage of coffee. Having the basics covered in this way seemed to give everyone great morale."
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:36:28+00:00
“The Full Moon Resort was in a beautiful location in the mountains and the food was of high quality with many options. There was no shortage of coffee. Having the basics covered in this way seemed to give everyone great morale."

My gratitude runneth over.

“This workshop should be a prerequisite before entering the real world of performing. My gratitude runneth over. I have my own band and they noticed a significant change in my playing and leadership. The workshop helped me acquire a higher standard in how I approach music.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:37:03+00:00
“This workshop should be a prerequisite before entering the real world of performing. My gratitude runneth over. I have my own band and they noticed a significant change in my playing and leadership. The workshop helped me acquire a higher standard in how I approach music.”

the best musical experience

“I left this workshop inspired to play and inspired to trust the music instead of listening to criticism from the jazz police. It was the best musical experience I have had. I learned a lot on an emotional level, not just an intellectual level, which is difficult to put into words.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:37:37+00:00
“I left this workshop inspired to play and inspired to trust the music instead of listening to criticism from the jazz police. It was the best musical experience I have had. I learned a lot on an emotional level, not just an intellectual level, which is difficult to put into words.”

It’s a chance to nurture one’s musical self

"It’s a chance to nurture one's musical self, and be thoughtfully guided to touch on key aspects of music making skills - additive rhythm, body, voice, and instrumental skills. It’s an opportunity to focus on playing with other sophisticated musicians who appreciate music as an endless exploration."
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:38:18+00:00
"It’s a chance to nurture one's musical self, and be thoughtfully guided to touch on key aspects of music making skills - additive rhythm, body, voice, and instrumental skills. It’s an opportunity to focus on playing with other sophisticated musicians who appreciate music as an endless exploration."

I feel like I’ve been given the key to a special language

"I feel like I've been given the key to a special language shared by a few select musicians and artists in the world. I will always remember and use this special gift whenever possible. Thank you!"
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:38:51+00:00
"I feel like I've been given the key to a special language shared by a few select musicians and artists in the world. I will always remember and use this special gift whenever possible. Thank you!"

CMS workshops are rare and treasured events.

"CMS workshops are rare and treasured events. I'm not aware of any other opportunity for a musician (or other artist) to meet, work and live with and learn from such an array of creative, generous people. At each CMS workshop I've attended, I've come away inspired to delve more deeply into a couple of areas to which I conclude I haven't been paying the proper amount of attention -- this time it was polyrhythms and Marilyn Crispell's compositional strategies, but next time I'm sure it'll be something different. Participation in the workshops has enhanced my confidence and willingness to trust myself; it's extremely rewarding to take chances and try new things with such talented, supportive musicians, and to be able to communicate and connect on such a deep level."
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:39:50+00:00
"CMS workshops are rare and treasured events. I'm not aware of any other opportunity for a musician (or other artist) to meet, work and live with and learn from such an array of creative, generous people. At each CMS workshop I've attended, I've come away inspired to delve more deeply into a couple of areas to which I conclude I haven't been paying the proper amount of attention -- this time it was polyrhythms and Marilyn Crispell's compositional strategies, but next time I'm sure it'll be something different. Participation in the workshops has enhanced my confidence and willingness to trust myself; it's extremely rewarding to take chances and try new things with such talented, supportive musicians, and to be able to communicate and connect on such a deep level."

a workshop for musicians of all backgrounds

“This is a workshop for musicians of all backgrounds to come together and make music that exists solely in the moment. It’s a chance for a musician to free themselves from the bonds of musical style and just play, while keeping their voices fully intact.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:40:34+00:00
“This is a workshop for musicians of all backgrounds to come together and make music that exists solely in the moment. It’s a chance for a musician to free themselves from the bonds of musical style and just play, while keeping their voices fully intact.”

brilliant, visceral, challenging

“Workshop content was brilliant, visceral, challenging if you wanted it to be, worldly and very interesting.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T03:41:07+00:00
“Workshop content was brilliant, visceral, challenging if you wanted it to be, worldly and very interesting.”

be a part of something bigger than oneself

“The conversation is stimulating. The atmosphere is great and the people are friendly. It’s an opportunity to be heard, but also be a part of something bigger than oneself.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T00:09:12+00:00
“The conversation is stimulating. The atmosphere is great and the people are friendly. It’s an opportunity to be heard, but also be a part of something bigger than oneself.”

It’s kind of like a spiral going upward

“CMS always gives a chance to see what is old in a new light. It’s kind of like a spiral going upward, returning to familiar places over and over, but at an ever higher level, a higher perspective.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T22:13:58+00:00
“CMS always gives a chance to see what is old in a new light. It’s kind of like a spiral going upward, returning to familiar places over and over, but at an ever higher level, a higher perspective.”

I loved all of the workshops.

“I loved all of the workshops. But the number-one thing for me is to be in an environment where my sole purpose is to play music. The little bits of impromptu sessions before and after the workshops are great.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T22:15:27+00:00
“I loved all of the workshops. But the number-one thing for me is to be in an environment where my sole purpose is to play music. The little bits of impromptu sessions before and after the workshops are great.”

“CMS provides an environment in which anyone can discover whatever music is within and discover the thoroughly natural process of letting it come out.”
creative music studio
2016-02-21T22:15:58+00:00
“CMS provides an environment in which anyone can discover whatever music is within and discover the thoroughly natural process of letting it come out.”

I really don’t know how it could have been better.

“The bottom line is, I really don’t know how it could have been better. It just felt perfect to me. I just would have liked more. I am deeply grateful to all who are responsible for keeping CMS alive.”
creative music studio
2016-02-21T22:16:37+00:00
“The bottom line is, I really don’t know how it could have been better. It just felt perfect to me. I just would have liked more. I am deeply grateful to all who are responsible for keeping CMS alive.”

It was the best musical experience I have had.

“I learned how to listen better and how to listen for the music instead of my ego trying to make something happen. At the Jamey Aebersold camp, I had a lot of people telling me things like, “You can’t play those voicings, play it this way, etc.” I left this workshop inspired to play and inspired to trust the music instead of listening to criticism from the jazz police. It was the best musical experience I have had. I learned a lot on an emotional level, not just an intellectual level, which is difficult to put into words. So it’s hard to say more.”
creative music studio
2016-02-21T22:17:21+00:00
“I learned how to listen better and how to listen for the music instead of my ego trying to make something happen. At the Jamey Aebersold camp, I had a lot of people telling me things like, “You can’t play those voicings, play it this way, etc.” I left this workshop inspired to play and inspired to trust the music instead of listening to criticism from the jazz police. It was the best musical experience I have had. I learned a lot on an emotional level, not just an intellectual level, which is difficult to put into words. So it’s hard to say more.”

“I loved seeing how great musicians approach new music, and playing alongside them is very educational.”
creative music studio
2016-02-21T22:18:06+00:00
“I loved seeing how great musicians approach new music, and playing alongside them is very educational.”

“I learned the value of listening in collaborative composition, a most wonderful experience, all around.”
creative music studio
2016-02-21T22:18:33+00:00
“I learned the value of listening in collaborative composition, a most wonderful experience, all around.”

“I loved it all.

“I loved it all. I was really pleasantly surprised by the whole event. The location was beautiful and the food was great. All of the artists were great. It was great to be able to have informal conversations with them at meals. The other participants were all great. Karl an Ingrid were absolutely wonderful.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T22:19:12+00:00
“I loved it all. I was really pleasantly surprised by the whole event. The location was beautiful and the food was great. All of the artists were great. It was great to be able to have informal conversations with them at meals. The other participants were all great. Karl an Ingrid were absolutely wonderful.”

“The vibe was probably the best thing. It always felt positive.”
creative music studio
2016-02-21T22:19:40+00:00
“The vibe was probably the best thing. It always felt positive.”

“Thanks for everything!”

“It’s a workshop where you get to learn from some really amazing musicians in a really beautiful environment along with like-minded people that you get to know, all with a really positive/engaging vibe. Zero competitiveness among participants. It was an amazing learning experience. Thanks for everything!”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T22:20:15+00:00
“It’s a workshop where you get to learn from some really amazing musicians in a really beautiful environment along with like-minded people that you get to know, all with a really positive/engaging vibe. Zero competitiveness among participants. It was an amazing learning experience. Thanks for everything!”

“I learned to think in terms of the whole ensemble as a unit. I enjoyed the enthusiasm of all the participants, as well as the instructors.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-02-21T22:20:44+00:00
“I learned to think in terms of the whole ensemble as a unit. I enjoyed the enthusiasm of all the participants, as well as the instructors.”

It was a life changing experience

“It was a life changing experience, which opened windows on a variety of modalities of music improvisation. The jazz idiom was central, and most participants were fluent in it, but it was not the only idiom. World music (which could have been developed further) and contemporary classical music lurked around in everything we did.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-03-06T22:02:10+00:00
“It was a life changing experience, which opened windows on a variety of modalities of music improvisation. The jazz idiom was central, and most participants were fluent in it, but it was not the only idiom. World music (which could have been developed further) and contemporary classical music lurked around in everything we did.”

“Striking to me was the human, and almost spiritual aspect of the workshop, as incorporated in the music practice and the relationship between participants and some of the guiding artists. “
creative music studio
5.0
2016-03-06T22:02:47+00:00
“Striking to me was the human, and almost spiritual aspect of the workshop, as incorporated in the music practice and the relationship between participants and some of the guiding artists. “

“I was challenged and inspired

“I was challenged and inspired by the different approaches taken by the guiding artists, and I thought all were outstanding. I also enjoyed meeting the other participants and sharing in their ideas, experiences and perspectives.”
creative music studio
4.0
2016-03-06T22:03:24+00:00
“I was challenged and inspired by the different approaches taken by the guiding artists, and I thought all were outstanding. I also enjoyed meeting the other participants and sharing in their ideas, experiences and perspectives.”

gets to the heart of things

“I will most remember the incredible music played by the guest artists. Great to hear such virtuosity, feel, and originality. I can't express it clearly, but there is something about this way of playing that gets to the heart of things rather than just recreating a style. No museum music here. There were moments when the hall lifted off the ground.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-03-06T22:04:18+00:00
“I will most remember the incredible music played by the guest artists. Great to hear such virtuosity, feel, and originality. I can't express it clearly, but there is something about this way of playing that gets to the heart of things rather than just recreating a style. No museum music here. There were moments when the hall lifted off the ground.”

“I'm revisiting the GAMALATAKI material with renewed vigour, even using it to improve my swim stroke. Try doing the elementary backstroke in 5/4. it works! I've learned that the approach to the down stroke - sweeping your arms up from your sides to above your head - is just as important as the down stroke itself, which is just what Karl emphasized in attending to all aspects of the pulse equally.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-03-06T22:04:54+00:00
“I'm revisiting the GAMALATAKI material with renewed vigour, even using it to improve my swim stroke. Try doing the elementary backstroke in 5/4. it works! I've learned that the approach to the down stroke - sweeping your arms up from your sides to above your head - is just as important as the down stroke itself, which is just what Karl emphasized in attending to all aspects of the pulse equally.”

a very rewarding experience for me!

“This was a very rewarding experience for me! I enjoyed being in nature and around people of like mindsets – no ego, no notions of what music is or isn’t. I was very excited and left so inspired, filled with encouragement.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-03-06T22:05:56+00:00
“This was a very rewarding experience for me! I enjoyed being in nature and around people of like mindsets – no ego, no notions of what music is or isn’t. I was very excited and left so inspired, filled with encouragement.”

“I liked the way that workshops seemed to be geared to just about everyone in the room. So a professional might gain as much as an intermediate player. Getting to immerse myself in the thinking and practice of playing more freely gave lots of knew ideas that I am already using in my practice (and trying to incorporate into performance).”
creative music studio
2016-03-06T22:09:24+00:00
“I liked the way that workshops seemed to be geared to just about everyone in the room. So a professional might gain as much as an intermediate player. Getting to immerse myself in the thinking and practice of playing more freely gave lots of knew ideas that I am already using in my practice (and trying to incorporate into performance).”

one of the most engaging musical experiences I have ever taken part in.”

“The improvising orchestra was not only a highlight of the workshop, it was one of the most engaging musical experiences I have ever taken part in.”
creative music studio
5.0
2016-03-06T22:09:55+00:00
“The improvising orchestra was not only a highlight of the workshop, it was one of the most engaging musical experiences I have ever taken part in.”

“I wanted to start to understand how musicians who play more freely (for lack of a better term) prepare to do what they do. I got that and more.”
creative music studio
2016-03-06T22:11:23+00:00
“I wanted to start to understand how musicians who play more freely (for lack of a better term) prepare to do what they do. I got that and more.”

“I have attended many jazz music camps, CMS was the most intimate and engaging. I learned things that I am sure I will continue to try to apply for a long time. “
creative music studio
2016-03-06T22:11:56+00:00
“I have attended many jazz music camps, CMS was the most intimate and engaging. I learned things that I am sure I will continue to try to apply for a long time. “

it was rewarding

I really enjoyed having the opportunity to play with experienced, talented musicians dedicated to improvisation and seeing how I could contribute to and become part of a collective musical expression with them; it was rewarding (and, at least to some extent, validating), and I can already sense the effect that experience is having on my playing, both individually and with others.
creative music studio
5.0
2016-03-06T22:13:19+00:00
I really enjoyed having the opportunity to play with experienced, talented musicians dedicated to improvisation and seeing how I could contribute to and become part of a collective musical expression with them; it was rewarding (and, at least to some extent, validating), and I can already sense the effect that experience is having on my playing, both individually and with others.

"I have a closer relationship with music and my role in it than I had before, which may not have been exactly what I was looking for when I signed up, but which I'm delighted to have."
creative music studio
5.0
2016-03-06T22:14:14+00:00
"I have a closer relationship with music and my role in it than I had before, which may not have been exactly what I was looking for when I signed up, but which I'm delighted to have."

Being a part of the CMS community has helped me grow

“Being a part of the CMS community has helped me grow as an artist and as a professional. Playing music with people has a way of softening and blurring the lines between generations, socio-economic groups, races, and genders — this is why supporting young artists and musicians like me through generous donations to CMS is so incredible, because it helps bring the full potential of music into being!”
creative music studio
5.0
2017-03-01T23:10:19+00:00
“Being a part of the CMS community has helped me grow as an artist and as a professional. Playing music with people has a way of softening and blurring the lines between generations, socio-economic groups, races, and genders — this is why supporting young artists and musicians like me through generous donations to CMS is so incredible, because it helps bring the full potential of music into being!”

“Thank you to the lovely people who donated, allowing me to attend the CMS Spring Workshop on scholarship. I think CMS more than any organization today is committed to developing new modes of music-making while exploring the possibilities of speed of sound communication!”
creative music studio
5.0
2017-03-01T23:13:55+00:00
“Thank you to the lovely people who donated, allowing me to attend the CMS Spring Workshop on scholarship. I think CMS more than any organization today is committed to developing new modes of music-making while exploring the possibilities of speed of sound communication!”

A great learning environment

“A great learning environment for methods and processes you would not normally encounter in more traditional music seminars. The guest artists are always so very helpful and generous with their time, even outside the regular sessions — during meals and student performance sessions.”
creative music studio
5.0
2017-03-01T23:14:34+00:00
“A great learning environment for methods and processes you would not normally encounter in more traditional music seminars. The guest artists are always so very helpful and generous with their time, even outside the regular sessions — during meals and student performance sessions.”

no two notes are the same

“Because I play music nearly every day, I can get stuck in ruts in my thinking and playing. This workshop gave me a refresh and recharge. As Karl Berger reminded us, no two notes are the same. You play a G and then you play it again, and the sound waves are always different. If through the power of listening we can tune into this, then we will never hear the same note twice. There will be no ruts to get stuck in. This is why I play music. I’d like to thank the donors and sponsors of Creative Music Studios for their generosity, as they have provided me with this incredible opportunity to reconnect with my musical purpose, and to study with some of the greatest musicians alive in the world today.”
creative music studio
2017-03-01T23:15:32+00:00
“Because I play music nearly every day, I can get stuck in ruts in my thinking and playing. This workshop gave me a refresh and recharge. As Karl Berger reminded us, no two notes are the same. You play a G and then you play it again, and the sound waves are always different. If through the power of listening we can tune into this, then we will never hear the same note twice. There will be no ruts to get stuck in. This is why I play music. I’d like to thank the donors and sponsors of Creative Music Studios for their generosity, as they have provided me with this incredible opportunity to reconnect with my musical purpose, and to study with some of the greatest musicians alive in the world today.”
3.0
39
Guiding Artist Biographies:

Mary Halvorson, guitarist, composer, bandleader

Guita   rist/composer Mary Halvorson has been called “NYC’s least-predictable improviser” (Howard Mandel, City Arts), “the most forward-thinking guitarist working right now” (Lars Gotrich, NPR.org) and “one of today’s most formidable bandleaders” (Francis Davis, Village Voice). Ms. Halvorson is best known for her longstanding trio, featuring bassist John Hébert and drummer Ches Smith, and more recently for her solo guitar project, Meltframe. She has several other projects as a bandleader including a quintet, septet and octet. Collaborative projects include a chamber-jazz duo with violist Jessica Pavone, the avant-rock band People and the collective ensembles Thumbscrew (with Michael Formanek and Tomas Fujiwara) and Secret Keeper (with Stephan Crump). Ms. Halvorson is also an active member of bands led by Anthony Braxton, Taylor Ho Bynum, Trevor Dunn, Tomas Fujiwara, Ingrid Laubrock, Joe Morris, Tom Rainey, Mike Reed and Marc Ribot, among others.

 

Billy Martin

Billy Martin, percussionist, educator, visual artist
Above all else, Billy Martin believes in the power of unguarded expression to capture glimpses of the truth – sometimes only fleetingly, sometimes for extended, intoxicating stretches. He pursues the ecstatic and the insightful from a variety of vantage points: as a drummer and percussionist, as a composer, as a filmmaker, sculptor, visual artist, and even as a carpenter. To varying degrees, each endeavor is marked by Martin’s dearly held belief that unfettered improvisation and an honest commitment to the moment at hand can bring about new levels of understanding, new perspectives, new sonic textures, and a more profound emotional impact. “In any circumstance, any medium,” he reflects, “you need to be sincere with yourself and with your audience. This is who you are, and you’ve got to be trying as hard as you can to create something for the situation that’s new and fresh. There are going to be some mistakes, it may not be perfect, but you’ve got to be willing to take that chance at any given moment.”

While Billy Martin’s own creative journey has had innumerable forks and bends, he is best known to music enthusiasts as one-third of the indescribable Medeski Martin & Wood. About to enter their twentieth year as a performing and recording aggregation, Medeski Martin & Wood are an entirely unique instrumental ensemble, able to apply principles from a staggering range of traditions (from free and modern jazz to classic R&B and well beyond) while remaining eminently accessible. Via fifteen albums, tireless touring (performing everywhere from jazz clubs to jamband festivals), and collaborations with the likes of John Scofield and John Zorn, the trio has united audiences from disparate corners of the musical universe who react with equal awe and enthusiasm to the band’s infectious grooves and undiminished exploratory zeal.

Few if any major acts are able to simultaneously function so successfully – both artistically and commercially – as a laboratory as Medeski Martin & Wood have, and their work exemplifies many of Martin’s ideals and principles as an improvising composer/performer. Forever refining and rediscovering his own signature sound, Martin vividly explores these notions of creative identity, of surrendering to the moment, of developing one’s own artistic voice, in Life on Drums, his feature-length directorial debut, which will be released on DVD by Vongole Films on October 8th, 2010. Sumptuously filmed in a disused New Jersey radio station, both informative and atmospheric, Life on Drums combines conversations with solo and group performances (some improvised, some composed) to create an engrossing portrait of Martin’s evolving musical aesthetic.

“Life on Drums is my reaction to all the bad instructional videos I’ve seen,” Martin elaborates. “Much of what’s out there tends to put a lot of focus on technique, but most creative things don’t come from technique. I want the viewer to see this and come away with the idea that they can be an artist – you don’t need this full spectrum of technique before you can start thinking creatively.” Accompanying Martin on this voyage is Allen Herman, Martin’s first drum teacher. The two converse about matters both practical and artistic, and it is their easy yet insightful rapport that helps to illuminate even the most elusive ideas. “It’s this strange kind of karma, this nurturing feeling I get from him,” Martin continues. “We first met in 1974, when he was my teacher. He has been in and out of my life a few times since then. He even stopped playing drums for a while. But now he’s turned it around, saying I am the one who is nurturing him. He is ecstatic to be back in the drumming world… 

When Martin first began studying with Herman, he was an energized, precocious teenager, residing in New Jersey – having relocated from Manhattan at age ten. His father, a classical violinist, photographer, and audiophile, ensured that Martin was surrounded by music for as long has he can remember. When recorded music wasn’t blasting from the ample sound system in the basement, the Martin home was alive with rehearsals and young Billy’s growing percussive prowess – initially sparked by the discovery of his older brother’s abandoned trap set. By high school, Martin’s musical obsessions began to flower: he was writing percussion cadences for the school marching band, performing with the student jazz ensemble, and had his first garage band – a power trio whose repertoire ranged from George Benson to Van Halen. He even subbed for Herman in the pit band of the Broadway show Bob Fosse’s Dancin’.

Upon graduation from high school, Martin bypassed full-time college, electing to make a go at being a professional musician in New York City. His arrival there in 1981 coincided with the emergence of a downtown music scene that dovetailed perfectly with Martin’s own sensibilities, holding equal reverence (or irreverence) for free improvisation, classic jazz, film music, and even the kitschiest of pop culture. Embracing every possible opportunity, Martin performed alongside such luminaries as John Scofield, Bob Moses, Bill Frissel, Cyro Baptista, Dave Liebman, Jerome Harris, and more. He went on his first tour as a member of Moses’s ensemble, and indulged his fascination with Brazilian rhythms by co-founding the group Batucada, who were a fixture on New York’s Brazilian scene for two years. After touring and recording with Chuck Mangione for two years (1987-1989), Martin reinvested himself in the downtown scene, participating in John Zorn’s Cobra improvisational game pieces and performing with John Lurie’s Lounge Lizards. 

Medeski Martin & Wood first convened in 1991, embarking on their remarkable journey, which continues to this day. By then, Martin was a formidable musician, armed with a rich cultural understanding of rhythm and a vast, tastefully deployed technical vocabulary. Over the past ten years, he has begun to impart unique musical philosophy in instructional contexts ranging from master classes to private instruction to his book, Riddim: Claves of African Origin, released in 2006. “I think that teaching can be as creative as performing and composing,” he explains. “I believe strongly that creativity and individual style is important. I feel so strongly about that, and the only way to be active or push people in that direction is to offer my teaching. Hopefully that will have a little ripple effect on the next generation of musicians.”

When not performing with Medeski Martin & Wood, Martin continues to collaborate with other musicians in improvisational projects, many of which are documented on his own Amulet Records imprint, which he founded in 1995. He also records and performs solo – with results ranging from the exploratory to the downright funky, as heard on his triple-LP/CD breakbeat extravaganza illy B Eats – and has taken an increased interest in composing for both percussion and chamber ensembles. An album of Martin’s chamber works, Starlings, was released by John Zorn’s Tzadik label in 2006. “My way of composing is to write sketches out to musicians,” he explains, “and to then let them work in a way that allows them to improvise based on the limitations I have given. Even when I work with my students and my percussion ensembles, there is always a little room for them to interpret my compositions. It’s exciting to me because you never know exactly what’s going to happen – it’s more rewarding for me and for the listener.”

Parallel to his musical adventures, Martin is an accomplished visual artist, whose drawings have been featured on album covers and in gallery exhibitions. His burgeoning interest in filmmaking has resulted in several music videos and short subjects, with Life on Drums being his first feature-length project. “Making videos and films – the whole idea of images moving along in a time frame: that’s very musical and rhythmic,” he reflects. “Whether it’s music or films or my drawings, I take the same approach: I improvise. I do have conceptual ideas I try to realize, but I think the best stuff comes out of improvisation. It comes from the same place, the same creative part of myself in the moment.”

With so many outlets existing for his creative energies, Martin is always in the midst of multiple projects. Even now, as he is helping to formulate Medeski Martin & Wood’s upcoming 20th anniversary celebrations, he is working to bring to light recently-recorded chamber compositions for a bass clarinet quartet, a documentary of the making of Medeski Martin & Wood’s Shackman album from recently-recovered videotape footage, and a sculpture project that combines composition with visual arts via graphically notated scores welded to oversized metal canvases. “It’s all more complicated than ever,” Martin concludes, “because now I have two boys, who are going to turn seven and ten soon. Handling the family life and home life with my work and creative projects is a delicate balance – but I have a studio-slash-shed in my backyard that I can use to get away and still be home. Honestly, I try not to keep everything too separate: it’s all creative living, it’s all satisfying. It feels good with each little thing I accomplish. I just have to give myself the time to improvise, to experiment. Usually I find the meaning later, after I’ve created it.”

Omar Tekbilek, multi-instrumentalist, educator
     Omar Faruk Tekbilek is now one of the most sought-after Turksish musicians, whose work transcends political boundaries while maintaining traditional sensibilities in a way few artists can manage.

Omar Faruk was a musical prodigy. He was born in Adana, Turkey to a musical family who nurtured his precocious talents. At the age of eight, he began his musical career by developing proficiency on the kaval, a small diatonic flute. His musical interests were being nurtured by his older brother and by a sympathetic uncle who owned a music store and who provided lessons. Omar Faruk learned the intricate rhythms of Turkish music, how to read scales and eventually he mastered several other instruments; ney (bamboo flute), zurna (double-reed oboe like instrument with buzzing tone), the baglama (long-necked lute), the oud (the classic lute), as well as percussion. By the age of twelve he began performing professionally at local hot spots. At the same time he studied religion with thoughts of becoming a cleric, or Imam.

In 1967, upon turning sixteen, he moved to Istanbul where he and his brother spent the following decade as in-demand session musicians. Omar Faruk stayed true to his folkloric roots, but during this period of frenetic session work in the metropolitan music scene, he explored Arabesque, Turkish, and Western styles and the compositional potential of the recording studio. In Istanbul he also met the Mevlevi Dervishes, the ancient Sufi order of Turkey. He did not join the order, but the head Neyzen (ney player), Aka Gunduz Kutbay, became another source of inspiration. Omar Faruk was profoundly influenced by their mystical approach and fusion of sound and spirit. During that time he was introduced to Hatha Yoga and eventually to Tai Chi, which he continues to practice daily.

Omar Faruk’s skills in the studio blossomed in Istanbul playing with some of the leading Turkish musicians of the day including Orhan Gencebay, flute and saxophone player Ismet Siral and percussionist Burhan Tonguc to name a few. After establishing himself as one of the top session musicians in Turkey, he began touring Europe and Australia. By 1971 at the age of 20, he made his first tour of the United States as a member of a Turkish classical/folk ensemble. It was while touring in the US that he met his future wife, Suzan, and in 1976 he relocated to upstate New York to marry her.

Omar Faruk found very few options for a Turkish musician in the US, so he formed a band called the Sultans with an Egyptian keyboardist, a Greek bouzouki player, and his brother-in-law on percussion. It started as a pop band but very quickly turned into a sort of Pan-Near Eastern ensemble. They began to attract some attention within the circle of Middle Eastern dance fans. They managed to record five albums during this time, but Omar Faruk was still unknown outside his local musical community. This was all about to change with the fateful meeting with Brian Keane in 1988. In the following years, he and Keane would produce another six recordings together, launching Omar Faruk boldly into the world music scene.

Omar Faruk Tekbilek has since established himself as one of the world's foremost exponents of Middle Eastern music. A multi-instrumentalist par excellence, he has collaborated with a number of leading musicians of international repute such as keyboard player Karl Berger, ex-Cream rock drummer Ginger Baker, Youssou N'Dour, Ofra Haza, Yasmin Levy, Simon Shaheen, Hossam Ramzy, Glen Velez, Bill Laswell, Mike Mainieri, Peter Erskine, Trilok Gurtu, Omar Sosa, Enrique Morente, Kodo (Japan), Tomatito, Jai Uttal and Steve Shehan among others. He has contributed to numerous film and TV scores and to many recordings including world sacred music albums, and has been touring extensively throughout the Middle East, Europe, Australia, North and South America.

Omar Faruk’s music is rooted in tradition, but has been influenced by contemporary sounds. He views his approach as “cosmic” and his commitment to music runs deep. The four corners of his creativity emanate mysticism, folklore, romance, and imagination. Like Omar Faruk himself, his music symbolizes diversity-in-unity.

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      Karl Berger, PhD: Composer / Arranger / Conductor / Pianist / Vibraphonist / Consultant
Founder and director of the nonprofit Creative Music Foundation, Inc., and creative leader of the legendary Creative Music Studio, Karl Berger is dedicated to the research of the power of music and sound and the elements common to all of the world's music forms. In addition to his composing and playing, Karl is known around the world for educational presentations through workshops, concerts, recordings, and with a growing network of artists and CMS members worldwide.

Karl Berger is a six time winner of the Downbeat Critics Poll as a jazz soloist, recipient of numerous Composition Awards (commissions by the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, the Rockefeller Foundation, European Radio and Television: WDR, NDR, SWF, Radio France, Rai Italy. SWF-Prize 1994). Professor of Composition, Artist-in- Residence at universities, schools and festivals worldwide, PhD in Music Esthetics.

Karl Berger became noted for his innovative arrangements for recordings by Jeff Buckley ("Grace"), Natalie Merchant ("Ophelia"), Better Than Ezra, The Cardigans, Jonatha Brooke, Buckethead, Bootsie Collins, The Swans, Sly + Robbie, Angelique Kidjo and others; and for his collaborations with producers Bill Laswell, Alan Douglas ("Operazone"), Peter Collins, Andy Wallace, Craig Street, Alain Mallet, Malcolm Burn, Bob Marlett and many others in Woodstock, New York City, Los Angeles, Tokyo, London, Paris and Rome.

He recorded and performed with Don Cherry, Lee Konitz, John McLaughlin, Gunther Schuller, the Mingus Epitaph Orchestra, Dave Brubeck, Ingrid Sertso, Dave Holland, Ed Blackwell, Ray Anderson, Carlos Ward, Pharoah Sanders, Blood Ulmer, Hozan Yamamoto and many others at festivals and concerts in the US, Canada, Europe, Africa, India, Phillippines, Japan, Mexico and Brazil.

His recordings and arrangements appear on the Atlantic, Axiom, Black Saint, Blue Note, Capitol, CBS, Columbia Double Moon, Douglas Music, Elektra, EMI, Enja, Island, JVC, Knitting Factory, In&Out, MCA, Milestone, Polygram, Pye, RCA, SONY, Stockholm, Vogue and others.

       Ingrid Sertso: Vocalist, Poet
Through her work with such avant-jazz musicians as Don Cherry and Karl Berger, Ingrid Sertso established herself as a captivating, adventurous vocalist, capable of blending jazz, African, South American and other worldbeat influences into a distinctive, hypnotic sound.

Although Sertso didn't become well-known until the release of Dance with It in 1994, she spent over 20 years honing her art. During the late '60s, she lived in Europe, leading her own trios and performing with the likes of Eric Dolphy, Don Cherry, Steve Lacy, Karl Berger and Leo Wright; she also worked as a music teacher at several institutions in Europe. In 1972, she became a permanent resident of the United States and she released her first album, We Are You, on Calig Records. Over the next few years she taught, while she performed in North America and Europe with the likes of Cherry, Ed Blackwell, Lee Konitz, Sam Rivers, Jimmy Giuffre, Bob Moses, Dave Holland, Perry Robinson and Jumma Santos. In 1974, she released Kalaparush on Trio Records in Japan. It was followed in 1975 by Peace Church Concerts on India Navigation/CMC Records.

In 1975, Sertso became a faculty member at the Naropa Institute in Boulder, Colorado. She stayed there through 1975 and 1976, before moving to the Banff Centre of Fine Arts in Calgary, Canada. She had two residencies at Banff before moving to the Creative Music Studio in Woodstock, New York, where she became the co-director. While working at the Creative Music Studio, she began singing in the Art of Improvisation with Berger and David Inzenon. In 1979, she toured major European cities as a solo artists, supported by the Woodstock Workshop Orchestra. She also released an album on MPS Records that year.

During the early '80s, Sertso remained a co-director at the Creative Music Studio, while continuing to record and perform with a variety of musicians, including such mainstays as Don Cherry and Karl Berger, as well as Paulo Moura, Nana Vasconcelos, Steve Gorn, Dan Brubeck and Mike Richmond. In 1984, she performed with the Music Universe Orchestra at the Kool Festival in New York and released a duet album, Changing the Time, with Berger on Horo Records in Italy. She also toured Europe twice during this time and she also toured West Africa with Olatunji and Aiyb Dieng.

Sertso's career picked up momentum during the latter half of the '90s. She held a series of concerts and workshops in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and she regularly tour the US on club and festival circuit. Sertso also toured Europe twice and sang solo vocals on Berger's orchestral ballet, The Bird. She was one of the co-leaders of Rhythm Changes, who released the Jazzdance album on ITM Records. During these five years, she also performed and recorded with a variety of artists, including Pauline Oliveros, Lee Konitz, Frank Luther, Anthony Cox, Leroy Jenkins, Jimmy Cobber, Linda Montano and Karl Berger.

In 1990, Sertso catapulted back into the mainstream jazz spotlight through her version "Until the Rain Comes" on Don Cherry's Multi Kulti album. Shortly afterward, she began working on a new album, but she became sidetracked by collaborating with Karl Berger and guitarist Paul Koji Shigihara. The trio blended original compositions with Sertso's poetry, improvisations and interpretations of traditional tune. Sertso also regularly performed poetry readings at the Tinker Street Cafe in Woodstock and the Knitting Factory in New York, and she also regularly played clubs along the Northeast coast. In 1994, she released her comeback album Dance with It, which earned postitive reviews. - Stephen Thomas Erlewine (All Music Guide)

 

        Ken Filiano: bassist
Bass player, composer, improviser, Ken FIliano has been performing throughout the world for thirty years, collaborating with leading artists in multiple genres, fusing the rich traditions of the double bass with his own seemingly limitless inventiveness. Ken leads two quartets, Quantum Entanglements, and Baudalino's Dilemma (Vinny Golia, Warren Smith, Michael TA Thompson), and is a co-leader of The Steve Adams/Ken Filiano Duo and TranceFormation (Connie Crothers, Andrea Wolper.) His extensive discography includes a solo bass CD, subvenire (NineWinds), and Dreams From a Clown Car (Clean Feed), which presents his compositions for his quartet, Quantum Entanglements (Michael Attias, Tony Malaby, Michael TA Thompson). Ken has performed and/or recorded with Karl Berger, Bobby Bradford, Anthony Braxton, Connie Crothers Quartet, Bill Dixon, Ted Dunbar, Giora Feidman Quartet, Vinny Golia ensembles, Taylor Ho Bynum, Jason Kao Hwang, Joseph Jarman, Raul Juanena, Joelle Leandre, Frank London, Tina Marsh, Warne Marsh, Dom Minasi, Barre Phillips, Roswell Rudd, ROVA Saxophone Qt., Paul Smoker, Fay Victor Ensemble, Pablo Zielger, and many more. Ken is on the teaching roster at the New School in New York, and is a guest artist lecturer at School of Visual Arts and Hunter College (New York). He teaches master classes in bass and improvisation, and has a private bass studio in Brooklyn.

Maria Kim Grand: saxophonist, composer 

Saxophonist, composer, and educator María Grand was born in Switzerland in 1992, to a Swiss mother and an Argentinian father. Upon her moving to New York in 2011, she quickly became the protégée of legendary musicians such as Billy Harper, and Antoine Roney, as well as NEA Jazz Master Von Freeman; in just a few years, she became one of the few fresh and unique voices on her instrument. María recently completed her first orchestral work; she has composed for saxophone quartet as well as numerous pieces for her ensembles. She has lead her group DiaTribe at venues such as The Jazz Gallery; Seeds; Three Concentric Sections; Shapeshifter Lab; the Cell; in New York, and AMR Jazz Club and The Walden in Switzerland. She released her first opus "TetraWind" in February 2017. In recognition of her emerging talent, she was awarded one of three of the 2017 Jazz Gallery Commission Residencies, along with young masters Adam O'Farrill and Joel Ross; her new work will be premiered in June 2017.
 
As a sideman, she has toured extensively with MacArthur Awardee Steve Coleman and his small ensemble, the Five Elements, as well as Steve Coleman and the Council of Balance and Steve Coleman and Natal Eclipse. She is a regular member of free funk/avant-garde jazz drummer, composer, poet, producer and professor Doug Hammond’s Quintet and of mridangam artist and scholar Rajna Swaminathan’s RAJAS. She also performs with Grammy Award winner Román Filiú in his groups Ouroboros and Quartería. María can be heard on Steve Coleman’s latest and critically acclaimed album, Synovial Joints.

 

As an educator, she regularly teaches private students. She has co-led "The Science of Jazz" at Lincoln Center with physicist Stephon Alexander; she has taught and helped teach workshops all over Europe, South America, and the United States, in institutions such as The Logan Center in Chicago, the Conservatory of Bologna in Italy, the Blue Whale in Los Angeles, as well as teaching informal improvisation workshops in Cuba and Colombia.

 

María has performed alongside musical luminaries Julian Priester, Vijay Iyer, Craig Taborn, Jen Shyu, Dafnis Prieto, Matt Mitchell, Marcus Gilmore, Adam Cruz, Anthony Tidd, Sean Rickman, Arthur Hoyle, Eric Alexander, Miles Okazaki, Damion Reid, among others; she has toured Europe, the United States, and South America, playing in venues and festivals such as the Village Vanguard in New York, La Villette Jazz Festival in Paris, Saafelden Jazz Festival in Austria, the Half Note Club in Athens, Millennium Park in Chicago, Roulette in Brooklyn, the Blue Whale in Los Angeles, the Northsea Jazz Festival (Netherlands), Porgy and Bess (Austria), Bird's Eyes (CH), IloJazz Festival in Guadeloupe, Millennium Park in Chicago, etc.
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About Full Moon Resort

Full Moon Resort, located one half hour west of Woodstock, New York, “the most famous small town in the world,” is a year-round mountain resort located in the heart of the "Forever Wild" Catskill Forest Preserve. Dedicated to the celebration of nature, music and the arts, this one hundred-acre wonderland of mountains, fields, and streams is a world of its own.

Full Moon is an alternative to more traditional country inns and resorts - with educational, recreational and artistic workshops, weekend-long destination country weddings, cutting-edge music camps, and art exhibits all part of its magical landscape.

"Music and art in nature" is a central theme at Full Moon Resort. Music is always in the air with the Music Masters Camp series, a special mid-week interactive musical experience with world renowned artists - complete with superb dining, comfortable country inn accommodations, and camping options.

Lovingly prepared, fresh, healthy cuisine served by a friendly, professional staff is the trademark of Full Moon Catering. The menus offer a full range of possibilities – hot buffet breakfasts and lunches, down-home country barbeques …tantalizing hors d’oeuvres and formal gourmet dinners in the Tent Pavilion. Fresh, natural ingredients (often organic) are the common thread throughout.

Accommodations are charming in their simplicity, with guest rooms available in a variety of lodges – some in a simple B&B style with shared hallway baths and others with private bath options.

In all, Full Moon Resort, with its picturesque grounds, cozy guest accommodations, excellent cuisine and friendly, professional staff, sets the stage for highly memorable experiences for those attending the Music Masters Camps.

Full Moon contact info:
E-mail: music@fullmoonresort.com
Telephone: 845-254-8009
Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm (EST)

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FAQ

When will my deposit be run?
 Your deposit will be run at the time of your registration.

What gear do I need?
 Bring your instrument(s) if they fit! Amps are not required. For more information, email music@fullmoonresort.com to see what will be provided.

What about beer/alcohol? CMS realizes that many of you want to consume alcoholic beverages at dinner and at night during performances and jams. To accommodate those who choose to drink, CMS has arranged to have wine/beer available at dinner and later at performances. Please help chip in by placing $5-$10/day into the bar-jar if you choose to drink alcohol. There are always complimentary alcohol-free beverages available, too.

Can I still come if I'm not a musician? 
Non-musicians are more than welcome and encouraged to attend. Vocalists and dancers are encouraged, too. We love listeners.

What skill level is required to attend?

Classes and curriculum are developed to accommodate all ranges of playing. All classes are optional and open to everyone.

Is there an age requirement? 
No. Minors are required to submit a parent/legal guardian consent form.

Are meals included?
 Three gourmet meals a day and snacks are included in your tuition.

If I want to bring my spouse, but they don't want to attend classes, can I? 
Yes. In order to bring a non-participant, you would need to purchase a "single occupancy" package. Non-participants have access to all meals and Full Moon facilities. Additional fees may apply. Call Full Moon to discuss.

When is check in and check out?
 Check in is at 3pm on arrival day and check out is at 11am on departure day. Due to Full Moon's busy event calendar, it is generally not possible to check in early or check out late.

How do I get there?
 Please see the 'Directions/Transportation' section below.

Is there cell phone reception at camp?
 No! There is no cell phone reception at Full Moon Resort. Complimentary phone service for all calls within the U.S. is available at all times at the Inn. Also, there is complimentary Wi-Fi available throughout the facility.

How do I make my final payment?

Your final payment will be automatically run on the credit card on file on the due date noted in your registration form. You may provide an alternative method of payment as long as it is received before the due date.

Can I take photos, video or audio recordings?

Yes. You may be required to sign a waiver stating all recordings, footage and/or photos will be used strictly for personal use and not commercially. CMS will ask you to sign a ‘release form’ for the organization’s use of audio and video recorded at the workshop.

What is the weather like at camp? 
Weather in the Catskills varies. In the spring, you can expect warm days (low 60s to upper 70s) and cooler nights (lower 40s to lower 60s). Fall can be cold – it can get into the 40s at night. Be prepared in case it’s cold.

What do you suggest I bring with me?
 Audio recording devices
, camera, clothes & toiletries (toothbrush, soap, shampoo etc...)
 - basically what you would bring to a hotel. Tent Campers- don't forget towels, sleeping bags, tarps, etc.! 
Please bring paper, pen, music stand, staff paper, water bottles, and cash for evening bars (There is no ATM on-site.)

Do you provide equipment storage for tent campers? 
This can be arranged on an as needed basis.

Can I select my own roommate?
 Yes - if that person is signed up as well. We cannot hold a spot for someone unless they have already registered.

How does the facility select my roommate? 
Full Moon Resort selects roommates based on age and gender. You will always be placed with a same-sex roommate.

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Pricing and Registration

Camp Packages are All-Inclusive!
Monday to Friday you will have access to all workshops, seminars, gourmet meals, performances, and camp activities. The only thing you have to do after signing up is get here!

All camp activities will be held at Full Moon Resort. Full Moon features an eclectic array of comfortable, rustic country-inn accommodations including simple B&B style guest rooms with shared hallway baths and guest rooms with private baths. “Primitive” campsites are also available. All accommodations are just steps away from daily music camp activities. The grounds offer one hundred acres of meadows, forests and streams providing a natural backdrop for an unforgettable, enriching experience.

Guest rooms at Full Moon do not have telephones, TV’s, air conditioning or daily housekeeping service. Wi-Fi, cable television and complimentary phone service are all available at the Inn (please bring a phone card for international calls). Enjoy the spring-fed swimming pool, on-site access to the Esopus Creek, and explore the splendors of the Catskills on the nearby network of hiking trails.

Please Note: There is no cell phone reception at Full Moon Resort or in Big Indian.

Package Pricing
 Note: Prices do not include applicable taxes and do not include a $10/day beer/wine charge if you choose to drink at dinner and at evening performances.

Full Moon Resort Accommodations:

Note: Prices include Full Moon Resort lodging, food and CMS workshops. Prices do not include applicable taxes or $10/day beer/wine fee.

Rates:

    $695 Tent Camping
    $895 Double Occupancy, Shared Bath
    $995 Double Occupancy, Private Bath
    $1,295 Single Occupancy, Shared Bath
    $1,595 Single Occupancy, Private Bath
    $495 Non-participant rates for spouse/children
Registration, Payment and Cancellation Terms and Conditions:

Your decision to register for Full Moon Resort Music Masters Camps constitutes your acknowledgement of and consent to all of the registration, payment and cancellation terms and conditions listed below.

Registration and Payments:
  • All rates are per-person
  • Since CMS is a nonprofit, we do not have to charge sales tax but we will charge a 1.5% online registration fee
  • Upon registration, a non-refundable deposit of $350 is charged to your credit card
  • 100% of the remaining balance due is automatically charged to the credit card on file on September 9, 2017
  • Any registrations received after September 9, 2017, must be paid in full at the time of registration
Cancellation:

All payments and deposits are non-refundable, except when approved by the Creative Music Foundation.

  • Cancellations received before September 9, 2017 will not be charged the remaining balance.
  • Cancellations received after September 9, 2017 will be charged the full remaining balance.

Due to the nature of our events and strict cancellation policies, Creative Environments, LLC DBA Full Moon Resort strongly suggests purchasing travel insurance.

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Full Moon contact info:
E-mail: music@fullmoonresort.com
Telephone: 845-254-8009
Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm (EST)

Traveling to Full Moon Resort

CMS Workshops are held in Big Indian, New York, which is centrally located in the heart of the “Forever Wild” Catskill forest preserve.

Full Moon Resort: 
1 Valley View Road
, Big Indian, NY 12410
Directions to Full Moon Resort

By Car: 
Parking is complimentary for all participants.

From Albany and points North: 
Take the New York State Thruway (I-87) South towards New York City. 
Take Exit 19, Kingston (see below)

From New York City and Points South:
 Take the New York State Thruway (I-87) North/West to Exit 19, Kingston. 
After toll, merge slightly right onto Route 28 West (towards Pine Hill)
. Travel approximately 30 miles on Route 28 West to Big Indian/Oliverea. 
Turn left onto County Route 47 (just after a brown sign on Route 28 which says Oliverea 3 miles). 
Proceed 5 miles on County Route 47 (Oliverea Road). 
You will see signs for Full Moon on the right-hand side.

By Plane:
 The closest airports to Big Indian are one hour and thirty minutes away:
 Albany International Airport and Stewart/Newburgh International Airport.

  • Albany International Airport (ALB):
 737 Albany Shaker Rd., 
Albany, NY 12211. 
Phone: (518) 242.2222 
http://www.albanyairport.com/
  • Stewart-Newburgh International Airport (SWF):
 1180 1st Street
, New Windsor, NY 12553 
Phone: (845) 564-2100 
http://www.panynj.gov/airports/stewart.html
  • JFK and LaGuardia Airports in New York City are approximately two and a half hours from Big Indian.

 Airport Car Services:
 Woodstock Town Car Service: (845) 679-6656
; Black Diamond Transportation: (845) 338-8426.

By Bus: 
Adirondack Trailways buses run from NYC and Kingston, NY. There is a stop on Route 28 at the Big Indian post office, just five miles from Full Moon Resort. Email us at music@fullmoonresort.com to arrange a pick up from the Big Indian bus stop to Full Moon Resort.

NYC buses depart from the Port Authority bus terminal in Manhattan at 9.30am, 12.30pm and 3.30pm (EST) daily and take approximately three hours to reach Big Indian. One way fare is approximately $35, return is approximately $70.
For additional schedule information and bus stop locations, visit www.trailwaysny.com or call 1-800-776-7548

Big Indian Bus Stop Located At the Big Indian Post Office:
 8279 State Route 28, 
Big Indian, NY 12410. 
*Email music@fullmoonresort.com to let us know when you will be arriving and we will be sure to have a shuttle waiting to bring you to camp!

By Train:
 The closest train station is in Rhinecliff, NY which is approximately one hour away from Big Indian.

Rhinecliff Amtrak Station (RHI): 
Hutton St. and Charles St.,
 Rhinecliff, NY 12574
. Phone: 1 (800) 872-7245
. Station and Service Hours: Open 7 Days a Week: 5:30am-10:30pm

**Carpooling is suggested!

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